Mixing Methods in Assessing Coaches' Decision Making

By Vergeer, Ineke; Lyle, John | Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, June 2007 | Go to article overview

Mixing Methods in Assessing Coaches' Decision Making


Vergeer, Ineke, Lyle, John, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport


Mixing methods has recently achieved respectability as an appropriate approach to research design, offering a variety of advantages (Tashakkori & Teddlie, 2003). The purpose of this paper is to outline and evaluate a mixed methods approach within the domain of coaches' decision making. Illustrated with data from a policy-capturing study on coaches' decisions about an injured gymnast's participation in competition, the approach involves the concurrent collection of quantitative and qualitative data and a three-phase process of data analysis. It is argued that (a) the method described can provide additional insights into the factors involved in coaches' decision making, beyond those provided via quantitative or qualitative methods alone, and (b) mixing methods holds promise for coaching research more generally.

Key words: coach cognitions, injury, policy capturing, reasoning

**********

Although combining different methods within one study is not new, explicit attention to the merits and principles of mixing quantitative and qualitative methods is relatively recent (Creswell, 2003; Tashakkori & Teddlie, 1998, 2003; Todd, Nerlich, McKeown, & Clarke, 2004). Teddlie and Tashakkori (2003) concluded that mixed methods is becoming the "third methodological movement." Attempts at creating typologies of mixed methods designs (for overviews, see Tashakkori & Teddlie, 2003) showed that combining quantitative and qualitative methods can be done in a wide variety of ways (e.g., concurrent or sequential, with equivalent or dominant/ less dominant status) and for a range of reasons. Reasons include triangulation (seeking convergence and corroboration of results from different methods studying the same phenomenon), complementarity (examining overlapping but different facets of a phenomenon), development (using the results from one method to help inform the other), initiation (discovering paradoxes, contradictions, fresh perspectives), and expansion (seeking to extend the breadth and range of inquiry by using different methods for different study components; Greene, Caracelli, & Graham, 1989; Tashakkori & Teddlie, 1998). In this paper, we aim to present one way of combining quantitative and qualitative methods to illustrate the possible application of mixed methods to coaches' cognitions and, specifically, their decision making. In so doing, we explore the efficacy and purposes of mixing methods to study coaches' cognitions and coaching research more generally.

Cognitive activity has been recognized as one of the foremost areas in understanding coaches' behaviors (Cote, 1998; R. L. Jones, Armour, & Potrac, 2004; Lyle, 2002). However, unlike the cognitions of other professionals, such as teachers or doctors (Elstein, Shulman, & Spratka, 1990), coaches' cognitions have thus far received limited empirical interest (Gilbert & Trudel, 2004). Cognitions generally refer to such mental activities as problem solving, judgment and decision making, planning, reasoning, and the generation, storage, and retrieval of knowledge (including declarative and procedural knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and values). Of these activities, those related to coaches' knowledge structures have, directly or indirectly, received the most attention. For example, the work of Cote and colleagues (e.g., Cote, 1998; Cote, Salmela, Trudel, Baria, & Russell, 1995) explicitly addressed the structure and content of coaches' knowledge, while a handful of other studies have focused on the ideological or practical content of coaches' knowledge in relation to actual behaviors (e.g., Saury & Durand, 1998; Strean, 1995). All these studies used qualitative designs, the latter combining interviews with behavioral observation.

Another approach to the study of coaches' knowledge has been to question coaches about their beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions in relation to specific issues. These studies have generally used quantitative, survey type designs to investigate a larger sample of coaches on a range of topics, varying from weight control and nutrition to psychological skills and doping (e. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mixing Methods in Assessing Coaches' Decision Making
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.