Environmental Factors Key in Anxiety Disorders

By Dixon, Bruce K. | Clinical Psychiatry News, June 2007 | Go to article overview

Environmental Factors Key in Anxiety Disorders


Dixon, Bruce K., Clinical Psychiatry News


ST. LOUIS -- Anxiety disorders may be transmitted from one generation to the next by specific family environmental factors such as parental modeling, overcontrolling parental behavior, and family conflict, according to a study presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America.

The role of genetics in anxiety is not clear, though it's thought that heredity is a minor player, said Kelly L. Drake, Ph.D., who is among several investigators trying to find answers to this complicated disorder.

A key factor in this parent-to-child psychopathology is anxiety sensitivity (AS), which is based on the belief that internal symptoms of anxiety will have harmful consequences socially, physically, or mentally. "Basically, anxiety sensitivity is the fear of fear," said Dr. Drake in an interview.

Anxious parents may transmit, verbally or nonverbally, misinformation to their children that can put them at risk for becoming hypersensitive to symptoms of anxiety--racing heart, sweaty palms, and feeling faint--and ultimately for developing full-blown anxiety disorders, said Dr. Drake, senior research program coordinator in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

Child anxiety disorders occur in about 10% of youth and are associated with significant impairment in functioning, she explained.

"These children often are misdiagnosed and therefore undertreated, and they tend to overutilize medical services," Dr. Drake said.

Known risk factors for childhood anxiety disorders include parent psychopathology; increased rates of anxiety disorders and somatic symptoms in children of anxious or depressed parents; a moderate genetic heritability; and parent anxiety sensitivity, Dr. Drake said.

Potential mediators of childhood anxiety include child anxiety sensitivity, which is predicted by parental anxiety sensitivity; and family environment, including threatening, hostile, or rejecting parenting styles, she said, adding that parents of anxious children often are described as anxious, controlling, overprotective, affectionless, and demanding.

Also, child anxiety is related to family environments with greater conflict, less cohesion, and poor communication.

Dr. Drake set out to test two hypotheses:

* Child anxiety will be influenced by parental AS and anxiety-based psychopathology, depending on the level of the child's AS.

* Child anxiety will be influenced by parental AS and anxiety-based psychopathology, depending on the levels of family expressiveness, conflict, independence, and control.

The study involved a multiethnic community sample of 157 youth-parent dyads. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Environmental Factors Key in Anxiety Disorders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.