Rockies and CPRA Keep Baseball Dreams Alive in Colorado

By Blum, Edward | Parks & Recreation, February 1995 | Go to article overview

Rockies and CPRA Keep Baseball Dreams Alive in Colorado


Blum, Edward, Parks & Recreation


The baseball strike ended the Colorado Rockies' baseball season and closed Mile High Stadium, but 48 young players--boys and girls ages 6-13--kept baseball fever alive in Colorado, thanks to the Colorado Rockies Baseball Skills Challenge.

The day before the Baseball Skills Challenge state finals, the Rockies vs. Reds game was canceled due to the Major League baseball strike, and Mile High Stadium was not available. But the 264 complimentary tickets for finalists, parents, and Colorado Parks and Recreation Association volunteers had been distributed.

Proving that "it ain't over till it's over," the finals were moved to deKoevend Park in Littleton and held on August 15. The change of location didn't lessen the enthusiasm and energy of either the participants or the spectators.

The program was run for the first time this year through a grant provided by the Colorado Rockies and produced by the Colorado Parks and Recreation Association (CPRA). Participants in the finals won their local and sectional competitions--proving their skills in running, throwing, and hitting and outscoring more than 3,000 participants--to earn the right to compete for the state championship.

The concept of statewide or national competitions in youth baseball skills is not new. But in Colorado, the Rockies have stirred up a whirlwind of baseball interest. With a new professional baseball team in its second season and the new Coors Field to open this April, the time was right for the Rockies and CPRA to join forces and reach out to aspiring young players. …

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