From Research to Management Models: Forming a Learning Framework the New Zealand Institute of Management Is Helping Individuals and Organisations Build Their Management and Leadership Capabilities. NZIM Auckland Chief Executive Kevin Gaunt Explains How

By Gaunt, Kevin | New Zealand Management, July 2007 | Go to article overview

From Research to Management Models: Forming a Learning Framework the New Zealand Institute of Management Is Helping Individuals and Organisations Build Their Management and Leadership Capabilities. NZIM Auckland Chief Executive Kevin Gaunt Explains How


Gaunt, Kevin, New Zealand Management


NZIM is building New Zealand's management and leadership capability. It does so by offering quality learning programmes for managers, a professional qualifications framework that recognises members' personal level of management skill and experience, and by providing a mentoring programme that enables them to tap into leading managers' experience.

NZIM seeks out the best international research and converts it into a practical Management Model that defines critical contemporary development targets as a foundation for these services.

The model helps managers match their existing skill level and experience and identifies areas to focus their ongoing learning and development. It also acts as a reference for NZIM mentors who can use the model to assess the needs of the people they are mentoring and then help guide them. Finally, the model enables NZIM to link its learning programmes to specific management development areas to provide a management development framework.

The model is made up of four groups of attributes: management, leadership, organisational development and governance.

It is based on the work of worldwide authorities on current and future management practice, and particularly on the long-term research of Jim Collins, independent researcher and author of the management classic Good to Great, John Kotter, the Konosuke Matsushita professor of leadership at Harvard Business School, and David Ulrich, the professor of business administration at the University of Michigan.

The first two key groups of attributes are management and leadership, which are really the opposite ends of the same spectrum.

A manager is, by dictionary definition, an organiser of business or someone responsible for directing and controlling the work and staff of a business. A leader is someone people follow and who guides or directs others. Management and leadership are intertwined in most management roles. So, to be an effective overall manager, it is essential to understand and develop both attributes.

MANAGEMENT NZIM's management model identifies six target areas for developing a capable manager. Each area is equally relevant to a new or experienced manager. They are targets for life-long learning. An increased depth of knowledge increases the manager's worth. These six management development targets are:

* a general understanding and study of management principles in theory and practice to build the individual's management toolkit;

* a good understanding of how the manager's organisation works so he or she can operate effectively within it;

* a good understanding of the external factors impacting an organisation to enhance understanding of the need for change as it arises;

* a general knowledge of the range of business disciplines across the organisation (finance, IT, marketing) to enable effective communication with other managers;

* having at least one area of expertise where the manager is recognised as a specialist to provide a strong "reason for being" in their organisation;

* developing a broad range of personal management skills that enable managers to communicate and work effectively with others--eg, presentation, time management, and report writing skills.

LEADERSHIP Leadership sits at the other end of the management spectrum as an essential component of effective management.

The NZIM model breaks leadership down into three core target areas for personal development--leadership ability, skill, and behaviour.

1. Leadership ability is about managers earning the right to be recognised as a leader in their organisation.

Being able to create and communicate a clear vision for action is a key leadership attribute as is the ability to focus on developing others to build the organisation. Able leaders think strategically, are self aware so that they can see what reality is and make effective decisions. …

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From Research to Management Models: Forming a Learning Framework the New Zealand Institute of Management Is Helping Individuals and Organisations Build Their Management and Leadership Capabilities. NZIM Auckland Chief Executive Kevin Gaunt Explains How
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