CEO Perception of Customer Satisfaction: An Empirical Study

By Bexley, James B.; Maniam, Balasundram | Academy of Marketing Studies Journal, January 2003 | Go to article overview

CEO Perception of Customer Satisfaction: An Empirical Study


Bexley, James B., Maniam, Balasundram, Academy of Marketing Studies Journal


ABSTRACT

This paper examines chief executive officers' perceptions relative to customer satisfaction. Additionally, customers of the chief executive officers' banks were asked to indicate their expectations concerning customer satisfaction. First, a survey was sent to chief executive officers from 60 banks, with 41 banks responding. Subsequently, 150 surveys were sent to each of the 41 responding banks for random distribution to each tenth customer who came to the lobby or motor bank. Both customers and chief executive officers were surveyed in the three major population areas of Texas (Houston, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Austin-San Antonio). 'The research included both urban and rural banks within the three major population areas. Significant evidence of the disparity between chief executive officers' perceptions concerning customer satisfaction and that of the customers' actual expectations was noted..

INTRODUCTION

Customer satisfaction related to expectation fulfillment is an extremely important and critical issue facing organizations in the complex business environment of today. The banking industry is, certainly not an exception to this premise. In fact, it has been widely held in financial institutions that customer satisfaction may be the most influential factor in the selection of a banking institution. Likewise, with all of the changes taking place in the financial marketplace and the increase in competition, it becomes apparent that more attention must be given to customer service and satisfaction.

Based on what customers have indicated in various banking situations, personalized and quality customer service will provide banks with the ability to be more competitive than those banks who fail to deliver the expected level of quality service.

To develop and implement a successful customer relations program, a financial institution must begin by determining the inherent view within the organization relative to customer service. Usually, it is determined that management sets the standard by which an organization establishes its goals and objectives. For management to set the standard, there must be some perception of what the customer or prospective customer wants and needs. By inference, the employees and officers of a financial institution usually exhibit those service characteristics emanated by management.

Therefore, it is not only important to obtain customer input as to the services and products they desire, but it is equally important to receive management's perceptions of the customers' wants and needs to avoid situations where the institution fails to live up to customer expectations due to failed communications. For example, management may determine that his/her bank does not need more than one automated teller machine. Management's basis for the decision is based upon low usage of an existing machine in a poor location. On the other hand, customers may be moving from that bank because they believe the competition has machines in locations that better meet their needs.

This empirical study examines management perceptions against customer expectations of quality service, and shows the gap between perception and expectation.

EXISTING LITERATURE

The American Bankers Association (1994) reported that during the past decade banks have seen their customer base decline. Efforts to reduce this decline have not proved successful to date. One thing that appears to be promising is the implementation of good customer service. To implement good customer service, it has been shown that researching customer expectations and determining customer desires is vital. Studies have shown that developing programs that revolve around customer expectations is necessary in the implementation of a successful customer relations atmosphere (Zeithaml, Parasuraman, & Berry, 1990). This directly relates to the implementation of a successful customer satisfaction program that measures and delivers goods and services. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CEO Perception of Customer Satisfaction: An Empirical Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.