Theater's Stars Are Backstage, Too; Volunteers Are Vital to the Success of Players by the Sea, Now in Its 40th Year

By Fitzroy, Maggie | The Florida Times Union, July 21, 2007 | Go to article overview

Theater's Stars Are Backstage, Too; Volunteers Are Vital to the Success of Players by the Sea, Now in Its 40th Year


Fitzroy, Maggie, The Florida Times Union


Byline: MAGGIE FITZROY

The blood looked real. After mixing chocolate cake mix, corn syrup and red food coloring in a bowl, special effects coordinator Shannon Jones was pleased.

"The blood has to look realistic when someone is bitten by Bat Boy," said Jones, one of the many Players by the Sea volunteers working on and behind the stage of the community theater's latest production.

The Jacksonville Beach-based theater is celebrating 40 seasons of performances this year.

From its first play in December 1966 to this month's Bat Boy, a musical about a boy who is half bat, volunteers have performed almost all of the work that makes the show go on.

All the actors, singers and dancers are volunteers. So are all the set designers, lighting technicians, makeup artists, people in charge of costumes, special effects, props and more.

Many work away from the stage. Members of a special team called the Angel Guild handle the box office out front, where they greet patrons and sell tickets. They also usher and tend the bar in the lobby.

Others, such as those on the mailing committee, work from home, addressing envelopes.

Volunteers even clean the theater, including the restrooms.

"It's very typical of community theater," said Executive Director Joe Schwarz, who has one of the theater's few paid positions.

Directors are paid a small stipend, but for all the months of work they do, it's almost volunteer, Schwarz said.

"People love doing it, that's why," he said. "They love theater, they love being in theater. It's a good social network. It's a great way to spend your time."

The theater, now at 106 Sixth St. N., put on its first production, George, on Dec. 3, 1966, at the Jacksonville Beach Community Center, which used to be downtown.

At a recent volunteer party in Ponte Vedra Beach, one of the founders, Deborah Lucas of Atlantic Beach, flashed back to those days.

Three married couples with theater-related backgrounds got together to plan the Beaches community theater because there was nothing like it at the time, Lucas said.

Ellie and Sammy Sampson of Ponte Vedra Beach, Tibbi and John Thorne of Atlantic Beach and Lucas and her husband, Jonathan, took turns meeting in each other's homes.

"We organized, selected plays, designated directors, found places to perform, appointed an attorney and started a charter," Lucas said.

Gail Featheringill of Jacksonville Beach was one of the first to volunteer for an acting role and has been performing at the theater ever since, for four decades.

She remembers all the places they put on plays, including the Ribault Garden Club building and the old Jacksonville Beach movie theater on First Street and Third Avenue North.

Performing in plays requires a large time commitment, said Featheringill, who is a court reporter in her day job. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Theater's Stars Are Backstage, Too; Volunteers Are Vital to the Success of Players by the Sea, Now in Its 40th Year
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.