Higher Education in the Global Economy: A Study Abroad Comparison

By Yang, Nini | Academy of Educational Leadership Journal, September 2005 | Go to article overview

Higher Education in the Global Economy: A Study Abroad Comparison


Yang, Nini, Academy of Educational Leadership Journal


ABSTRACT

Based on historical trends, recent shifts and emerging challenges, the study draws a multivariate contextual model to explain the competitive landscape of higher education in the global market with special attention to international exchange programs in the United States. U.S. educational exchange programs are analyzed from three perspectives: (a) enrollment trends of international students and their major contributions to the U.S. economy, (b) the growing demand for international experiences from American students and prospective employers, and (c) the importance of human capital development in a nation's long-term economic strength. Recent statistics indicate that the United States remains the most popular destination for international students, and international students contribute to the U.S. economy both in terms of their educational and living expenses in the host country and of their intelligence in research, technology advancement, and product innovation. Meanwhile, the world of higher education is increasingly competitive across borders. Multiple factors have led to a recent decline of international student enrollments in the United States. The study takes a comparative approach to address key variables and their interrelationships in the global context. Suggestions for future research and implications to the practical field are discussed.

RESEARCH BACKGROUND

Within the context of economic globalization and the growing need for human capital development around the world, the present study is focused on the role of higher education with special attention to international educational exchange programs in the United States. The competitive landscape of international educational programs is analyzed from three perspectives: (a) enrollment trends of international students and their contributions to the U.S. economy, (b) the growing demand for international experiences from American students and prospective employers, and (c) the importance of human capital development in a nation's long-term economic strength.

According to the most recent survey by the Institute of International Education (IIE 2004a), international students contribute approximately US$13 billion to the U.S. economy each year in terms of tuition, living expenses and family related costs. The U.S. Department of Commence described higher education as the country's fifth largest export in the service sector. Concurrent with many international students choosing the United States as their favorite destination for higher education, the number of American students electing to study abroad has been increasing rapidly but the outbound number is significantly smaller than the inbound number.

From a career perspective, employers tend to agree that candidates with an international learning experience are likely to possess key skills to meet job requirements such as communication, flexibility, leadership, innovation, maturity, independence, and interpersonal relationship (AEO, BC, DAAD, USDOE & USSD, 2003). From a human capital development perspective, a nation's long-term economic strength will to a large extent depend on the nation's ability to produce, support, and sustain a qualified, flexible, innovative, and mobile workforce. Economic globalization denotes a growing demand for human capital development and global mobility of human resources. As an example, of the 500 U.S. firms surveyed by the Hewitt Associates (2004), 45% indicated that they are currently using a global sourcing model to obtain cost efficient human resources. The percentage of jobs being outsourced is averaged 13% for those surveyed firms and will roughly double in about three years. At the same time, the strength of the U.S. higher educational systems helps attract and develop human capital supplies to the Untied States. American universities host international students and visiting scholars from all over the world, and many of them do research while pursuing a degree or seek career opportunities with U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Higher Education in the Global Economy: A Study Abroad Comparison
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.