Bringing Graduate Education to the Workplace: Paying for Books and Little Else, Company Employees Benefit from Webster University's Corporate Cohort Program

By Galuszka, Peter | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 12, 2007 | Go to article overview

Bringing Graduate Education to the Workplace: Paying for Books and Little Else, Company Employees Benefit from Webster University's Corporate Cohort Program


Galuszka, Peter, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Just after work at 5:30 p.m. most Wednesdays, Sheri Graham hops in her car, tosses her textbooks and notepads on the passenger seat, and settles in for a 90-minute drive to St. Louis from Farmington, Mo. There, at her employer s headquarters, Graham and 64 other employees are enrolled in a 2.5 hour-long graduate business class. She usually arrives home around 11:30 p.m.

Graham, human resources director for Parkland Health Center in Farmington, says the strenuous Wednesdays don't bother her. The health center is owned by the medical care firm BJC HealthCare Corp., which is paying most of Graham's tuition for the course. Next May, Graham will receive an MBA that will significantly enhance her value as a company employee.

"This program is excellent," she says. "A traditional program would not work for me."

"Traditional" is one word that does not describe Webster University's four-year-old Corporate Cohort Program. The St. Louis-based university partners with businesses, bringing classes directly to the work place.

"The importance of the course is that you deal with the flexibility issue right up front," says Dr. Benjamin Akande, dean of Webster's Graduate School of Business and Technology.

Between 250-300 students participate in Webster's corporate cohort program, which to date partners with companies in Arkansas, Colorado, California, Florida, Missouri and South Carolina.

Webster has been a pioneer in higher education outreach. Years ago, for example, it opened small campuses on military posts throughout the country and overseas to give military personnel the chance to earn college degrees.

Webster's cohort concept was the product of a collaboration with mass-retail giant Wal-Mart. Headquartered in rural Bentonville, Ark., Wal-Mart had been exploring on-site graduate studies that would be cost-effective yet convenient for employees. Webster operated a campus in nearby Fayetteville, and in 2003 the two began discussing ways to work together.

Akande says he sees a series of "win-win" results from the close collaboration that is the hallmark of the cohort program.

"You take people in large corporations who do not work together and you bring them together in a classroom environment," he says. "I think from a corporate expense perspective, this enhances communication and the flow of ideas."

Because the courses are taught on-site in the evenings, it's easy for company employees to attend. The program typically takes little more than two years to complete and involves about 12 courses five times a year. The majority of the courses cover MBA requirements, but electives can be tailored to meet the host company's needs. At BJC, for instance, the electives can be drawn from Webster's health care administration courses.

"They've been unbelievably flexible," says JoAnn M. Shaw, BJC's vice president and chief learning officer. "We needed to focus the finance course more on health care finance and they did it right away."

One big plus for participating companies is the cost. Shaw says the courses cost about $15,000 per employee, most of which is covered by the company. She says she and BJC's president and CEO, Steven H. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bringing Graduate Education to the Workplace: Paying for Books and Little Else, Company Employees Benefit from Webster University's Corporate Cohort Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.