New Postal Rates Take Toll on Interlibrary Loan Service

By Kniffel, Leonard | American Libraries, February 1995 | Go to article overview

New Postal Rates Take Toll on Interlibrary Loan Service


Kniffel, Leonard, American Libraries


Ramifications of the large increase in postal rates for library materials that went into effect Jan. 1 (AL, Dec. 1994, p. 976) are now hitting libraries across the country. Costs for mailing books have gone up from 66 cents a pound to $1.12 (with increments of 41 cents for each additional pound up to 30 pounds and 20 cents per pound beyond that), forcing some major library-rate mailers to discontinue books-by-mail service or library-rate delivery of reserved materials.

The King County (Wash.) Library System, for example, has ended for all but disabled people its popular books-by-mail service. Begun in 1972, the service shipped some 1.5 million items in 1994 at a cost of about $1.6 million.

Rebecca Cawley of the Northland Library Cooperative in Michigan said, "The size of this increase puts a significant strain on our already sparse budget, and I don't see how the Postal Rate Commission can justify the dispropotionate size of this increase."

Costs for interloan services at the Free Library of Philadelphia will rise some $20,000 this year, said Administrative Services Division Chief Bill Roberts. Add to that another $12,000 do will be eaten up by the rise in first-class postage used for overdue notices and other correspondence, he said.

Kay Vyhnanek, head of interlibrary loan services at Washington State University Library and chair of ALA's Interlibrary Loan Committee of the Reference and Adult Services Division, told AL that in addition to interlibrary loan and book delivery by mail, WSU approval programs will suffer cuts. "A lot of libraries are going to be hurt," she observed.

Arguments fell on deaf ears

In testimony last year before the Postal Rate Commission, ALA argued that the proposed library rate increase was unjustified compared with the 10% average increase proposed for all other rates. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Postal Rates Take Toll on Interlibrary Loan Service
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.