The "Consumer-Ization" of Business Data: Developments with Fortune and Wall Street Journal

Searcher, March 1995 | Go to article overview

The "Consumer-Ization" of Business Data: Developments with Fortune and Wall Street Journal


Every day it seems more leading electronic and print business sources release new electronic products over low-cost or free, easy-to-use, graphically supplemented venues of the Internet and consumer information utilities. Searchers accustomed to paying top dollar for text-only, delayed delivery of full-text sources could find the new emerging world of online business information profitable. In any case, they need to stay on top of developments that affect client expectations.

Two national leaders recently joined the move to the street -- Fortune magazine and the Wall Street Journal. As with most consumer-oriented electronic products, the differences between print and traditional online offer advantages and disadvantages.

Fortune magazine got the CompuServe treatment in January with the debut of FORTUNE-on CompuServe. The leading online consumer utility offers members access to the current issue of Fortune and the opportunity to exchange comments with the magazine's editors, reporters, and other readers. Searchers can also browse through back issues, participate in polls, send letters to the editors, view covers from the 1930s through 1950s, search the Fortune Industrial 500 as a database, and download Fortune Industrial 500, Service 500, and Most Admired lists into spreadsheets. They can also place online subscription or renewal orders, handle customer service questions, and order from the magazine's catalog of Video Seminars. To access the service menus, Compuserve searchers simply Go Fortune.

The Fortune-on-CompuServe forum retains complete text for the three most recent issues in the library section 1, plus six months of stories from "The Economy" and "Personal Investing" in library sections 2 and 3. Archive access to back years connects users to Magazine Database Plus from Information Access Company, but subset for Fortune. The "Fortune 500 Lists" appear in library section 5. Searchers can search online and rank companies by sales, profits, assets, stockholder equity, market value, total return to investors, and number of employees. Ranking options can include one industry or all companies in a city or state. Menu prompts walk searchers through the process. Some services in the new forum charge a premium price, e.g., the IAC archives, but many simply involve low standard connecthour rates running about the same as telecom charges on major commercial search services. In any case, the Compuserve version of Fortune answers the complaint many searchers have had for years about the lack of access to the content of the famous Fortune 500 lists.

Taking another approach, Dow Jones has released a customized Personal Journal version of the Wall Street Journal for business end users. Originally designed as part of a project to appeal to Personal Digital Assistants like Apple Newton, an idea whose time may not have come as quickly as expected, the Personal Journal provides a continuously updated, customized electronic newspaper in newspaper-like format with business news and top stories from the Wall Street Journal and other Dow Jones sources. It will even include advertising. Charter advertisers include Charles Schwab Corporation, sponsoring the Personal Portfolio section, and Hewlett-Packard Company, sponsoring Sports and Weather.

Users receive a Personal Journal installation software which helps them set up Personal News profiles and portfolios. The software needs a 386 IBM PC compatible or better running Windows 3.1 or higher with 4MB RAM (8 recommended), 3.5-inch 1.44 MB floppy drive, at least 10MB hard disk space, and a 9600-bps or faster modem. The Personal News' profile tracks company news and favorite Wall Street Journal columns. The Personal Portfolio tracks key stocks and mutual funds. Subscribers can download each day's edition and receive updates throughout the day through Sprintnet local numbers or an 800 number. The automated, single-click delivery of Personal Journal takes only a few minutes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The "Consumer-Ization" of Business Data: Developments with Fortune and Wall Street Journal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.