Integrating Quebec History into the Curriculum

By Collin, Marc; Letourneau, Jocelyn et al. | Quebec Studies, Spring-Summer 2006 | Go to article overview

Integrating Quebec History into the Curriculum


Collin, Marc, Letourneau, Jocelyn, Buck, Paul, Quebec Studies


Introduction

This article is intended to suggest ways to introduce American university students to Quebec history. Rather than giving a general presentation of Quebec historiography, we will begin by indicating how to show young Americans that Quebec history is both an interesting and enjoyable subject. For those students who know very little about Quebec, it is perhaps useful to underscore historical linkages between Quebec and the United States, which is the objective of the first part of the text. For more advanced students, who already have some grasp of Quebec history and culture, the second section will address a certain number of questions and debates on Quebec history.

Bibliographic references are given in English when possible. It is necessary to stress, however, that the ability to read French is a prerequisite for pursuing more advanced study in Quebec history because many major works on Quebec history have not been translated into English. Furthermore, consulting only English-language sources sometimes gives a narrow and partial image of certain key topics.

Although the majority of Quebec history researchers work in universities there, many in the field work elsewhere in the world. A good way to get to know them is by consulting with the Association internationale d'erudes quebecoises, whose headquarters are located in Quebec City. The AIEQ maintains a website (www.aieq.qc.ca) that contains a wealth of information and references on Quebec studies. It also publishes a regular bulletin that serres as a clearing house for all new developments in the discipline (publications, events, etc.). Several academic journals publish the most recent articles and research activities. The most notable are Quebec Studies, the American Review of Canadian Studies, the Revue d'histoire de l'Amerique francaise (RHAF), the Bulletin d'histoire politique, Mens: Revue d'histoire intellectuelle de l'Amerique francaise, the Canadian Historical Review, Recherches sociographiques, Recherches amerindiennes du Quebec, and Globe: Revue internationale d'etudes quebecoises. Several publications, both annual and ad hoc, are also useful for keeping up-to-date with what is happening in Quebec, while others provide available resources for research. Here is a short list:

Aubin, Paul. Bibliography of the History of Quebec and Canada, 1981-1985. Quebec: Institut quebecois de recherche sur la culture, 1990.

Chartier, Daniel. Le guide de la culture au Quebec: litterature, cinema, essais. Quebec:

Nota Bene, 2004.

--. Methodology, Problems, and Perspectives in Quebec Studies. Quebec: Nota Bene, 2002.

Senecal, Andre. A Reader's Guide to Quebec Studies. Quebec: Ministere des Relations internationales, 1999.

Venne, Michel, ed. L'Annuaire du Quebec. Montreal: Fides, 2002-.

The following works offer an overview and are good references for Quebec history in general:

Dickinson, John and Brian Young. A Short History of Quebec. Montreal/ Kingtson: McGill-Queen's UP, 2003.

Gagnon, Alain G., ed. Quebec : State and Society. Peterborough: Broadview, 2003.

Gentilcore, R. Louis, ed. Historical Atlas of Canada, vol. II: The Land Transformed, 1800-1890. Toronto: U Toronto P, 1987.

Hallowell, Gerald, ed. Oxford Companion to Canadian History. Toronto: Oxford UP, 2004.

Harris, R. Cole, ed. Historical Atlas of Canada, vol. I: From the Beginning to 1800. Toronto: U Toronto P, 1987.

Kerr, Donald and Deryck W. Holdsworth (eds.). Historical Atlas of Canada, vol. III: Addressing the Twentieth Century, 1891-1961. Toronto: U Toronto P, 1990.

Langlois, Simon, ed. Recent Social Trends in Quebec, 1960-1990. Frankfurt/ Montreal/Kingston: Campus Verlag/McGill-Queen's UP, 1992.

Linteau, Paul-Andre, Rene Durocher, Jean-Claude Robert, and Francois Ricard. Quebec Since 1930. Toronto: Lorimer, 1991.

* Quebec, 1867-1929. …

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