THE DJ Q & A DIGITALISM; Clubbing THEY Have Been Called the New Daft Punk and Have Set the Dance World Alight with Their Stunning Debut Album, Idealism. Now Digitalism's Ajens Moelle and Ismail Tuefekci Talk about Their New High Profile, Their History Together and How They Deal with Those Continual Daft Punk References

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), August 17, 2007 | Go to article overview

THE DJ Q & A DIGITALISM; Clubbing THEY Have Been Called the New Daft Punk and Have Set the Dance World Alight with Their Stunning Debut Album, Idealism. Now Digitalism's Ajens Moelle and Ismail Tuefekci Talk about Their New High Profile, Their History Together and How They Deal with Those Continual Daft Punk References


Byline: stuart barrie

Q WHEN did you guys first get together?

A We met seven years ago at a record store in Hamburg. The owner threw parties in Hamburg and he booked us together. Over time we got a bit bored of the usual vinyl output, so we started doing our own edits at home and looking for different music.

Q Where did the name Digitalism come from?

A When we started doing edits there was a series of records released on Yellow recordings called Africanism.

We liked the idea of using an Ism for naming the CD-Rs with our edits. As we were working with computers, we felt quite electronic and digital. Later, we remembered that word, kept it for our band, and built the whole Digitalism theme, which contains electronics, mystics, travelling and discoveries.

Q Who are your influences?

A We grew up with many musical genres, including Euro Dance, HipHop, Rave, Trance and Rock. Our first CDs were Snap! and De La Soul, in between we bought The Verve, Nirvana and Homework by Daft Punk.

Our biggest influences though are soundtracks, especially the orchestral ones like Jurassic Park or Star Wars and a general punk attitude, which you can find in many different musical styles.

Daft Punk have been sampling records, that are all punk, that way of thinking influenced us most. Then there's our studio that we write and produce in, it's a WWII bunker in Hamburg, without windows. It brings the garage band feeling into our music.

Q What do you think of the Daft Punk comparisons?

A Daft Punk have been pioneers in electronic music and are one of the few electronic acts who made it to radio and still exist after many years.

If people think similarly about us, we're OK with it.

Digitalism have a big vision, this is what we try to tell people.

Q Have you met the Daft Punk guys?

A Oh yeah, we have played with them a couple of times, twice last year on their comeback tour in Dublin and at Global Gathering, and then this year in Istanbul. They are nice guys and really like our music.

Q Is the new blood in dance taking over from the established hierarchy?

A Last decade was the time for the likes of The Chemical Brothers, The Prodigy and Daft Punk, now that time has passed, there is a new generation of clubbers and bands growing into the scene. So, we think it's not only about the acts, it's also about the audience, which is seeking its own new idols or bands to identify with. We wouldn't say the new blood in dance is replacing the established pioneers.

Q A lot of people think Idealism is one of the dance albums of the year. Did you ever think you were on to something special making it?

A We gave ourselves some guidelines. We didn't just want to do a compilation of club tracks or to fill a CD around the singles we'd released. We wanted it to be special, and if people think the same about it, we achieved the right thing.

Q How was T in the Park for you? …

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THE DJ Q & A DIGITALISM; Clubbing THEY Have Been Called the New Daft Punk and Have Set the Dance World Alight with Their Stunning Debut Album, Idealism. Now Digitalism's Ajens Moelle and Ismail Tuefekci Talk about Their New High Profile, Their History Together and How They Deal with Those Continual Daft Punk References
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