Tongues Are Set Wagging; Airwaves THE PEOPLE'S VOICE Tony Horne in the Morning Is Now on Air Weekdays from 5am on Metro Radio and Sundays from 10am

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), August 17, 2007 | Go to article overview

Tongues Are Set Wagging; Airwaves THE PEOPLE'S VOICE Tony Horne in the Morning Is Now on Air Weekdays from 5am on Metro Radio and Sundays from 10am


Byline: TONY HORNE

SO, I am thinking I will write a warm piece about the tremendous pride I feel getting up at the crack tomorrow, travelling to Lords to watch Durham play in their first ever final.

Then Roy Keane opens his mouth!

Without doubt you have seen the fuss, but how have you taken it? In summary, some players are not too Keane to sign for the Mackems because their WAGs don't want to shop there.

I was on the radio taking calls on this subject at 5am on Wednesday morning before the world got hold of the storm. I said to my callers just one thing: "Watch now, right across the day, how this non-story will gather pace and how the local news will vehemently defend The Bridges etc in a desperate piece of parochialism."

I was right. And so is Roy Keane. After all, how many players have you tried to sign this summer? None. He's the one with the cheque book, so he has had that conversation. And he is right to stick it in the public domain. Very funny too, by the way.

Of course, local chiefs always respond by appearing to be, as we say in the media, 'up in arms' but you cannot be humourless about this, otherwise you just go to extend the perceived stereotype of the North East that Keano is highlighting.

That image is that we're still some run-down un-regenerated part of the world where nobody works, and nobody travels beyond Scotch Corner.

Wrong, of course. …

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