'Piltdown Man'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 17, 2007 | Go to article overview

'Piltdown Man'


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

'Piltdown Man'

Our mailbox overfloweth this week, thanks to Washington resident John Lockwood, who while conducting research at the Library of Congress came across an intriguing Page 2 headline in the Nov. 2, 1922 edition of The Washington Post: "Arctic Ocean Getting Warm; Seals Vanish and Icebergs Melt."

The story told how "great masses of ice have now been replaced by moraines of earth and stones," and "at many points well-known glaciers have entirely disappeared."

Our item about Mr. Lockwood's discovery was picked up by the likes of Rush Limbaugh and Matt Drudge, reaching audiences totaling in the millions, among them Charles H. Bertram of Ormond Beach, Fla.

"Al Gore's 'global warming' has to be the biggest hoax since England's missing link, 'Piltdown Man.' Look it up, happened about 1912," Mr. Bertram says.

Sure enough, that was the year one of the most famous archaeological hoaxes in history took shape in a gravel pit in the English village of Piltdown, where experts thought they had unearthed the fossilized skull of an early human. Wouldn't you know, more than 40 years later it was determined that a prankster had attached the lower jawbone of an orangutan to the skull of a modern human.

Then there's this letter from an otherwise concerned John Barnes of Lebanon, Tenn.: "Just read the Inside the Beltway note about the 1922 Washington Post article. What can be done to make sure that the environmental radicals do not get inspiration from Sandy Berger and go into the Library of Congress to steal, and then destroy, the article?"

Village idiot

"I feel like .. the idiot, because I feel like I'm distracting from the other things that are important, like global

warming and that kind of stuff I genuinely mean that. And I don't know what to do."

- Lindsay Lohan, lamenting on her recent public behavior during an interview with Elle magazine

Gipper's gaze

Look for Ronald Reagan to be keeping permanent watch over the U.S. Congress.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky told former first lady Nancy Reagan during a visit to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in California this week that he is working with other senators who want to erect a statue of President Reagan in the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Piltdown Man'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.