1952 Plymouth Love Grew out of Gardening Job

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 17, 2007 | Go to article overview

1952 Plymouth Love Grew out of Gardening Job


Byline: Vern Parker, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A woman in Clayton Miller's neighborhood hired him as a teenager to weed her garden. He kept it free of weeds, but something other than vegetation was what really captured his attention: her nearly new 1952 Plymouth Belvedere Cranbrook sport coupe.

That was the sporty hardtop coupe model that featured the unusual saddleback two-tone paint scheme.

"Ever since then I have always wanted one," Mr. Miller says about the Plymouth.

In 1998, he found a 1952 Plymouth painted iridescent sable bronze over suede in Bingingham, N.Y. He learned as much about the condition of the car as he could over the phone, including the explanation of how it had no rust because it had been in a museum for several years.

Finally Mr. Miller drove up to New York towing an empty trailer for an in-person inspection of the Plymouth. The car passed muster, but the price was more than he wanted to pay. Mr. Miller was about to drive back home to Woodbine, Md., when the seller suggested they get a cup of coffee. A few hours later, Mr. Miller returned home - with the 3,105-pound Plymouth on his trailer.

Mr. Miller got the car at the price he wanted, but the delay in leaving New York allowed a storm to blow in. "I drove on ice four hours to get home," he said.

When he got there, he carefully looked over the Plymouth to reaffirm his first inspection.

"I started to work on it as soon as I got back home," he said.

As he was taking the car apart, he found under the back

seat a plastic clam fork with "Silo Inn Restaurant" printed on the handle. That clue led him to a Richmond man, who said that he was the second owner of the Plymouth and that he had sold it to the museum in New York.

To begin restoring the car, Mr. Miller detailed the undercarriage, installed new brakes and thoroughly went over the entire drivetrain. The interior remains original.

Mr. Miller then had all its chrome removed and sent off for replating while the rest of the Plymouth was stripped for repainting.

The entire rehabilitation project was completed in six months. All of the stainless steel trim has been polished to shine like new, including the trim around the rear window, which divides the window into thirds.

Because the 1951 and 1952 versions of the car were virtually identical, the manufacturer did not keep separate annual production figures. …

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