Phi Kappa Phi & Distance Education

By McKenzie, Wendell H. | Phi Kappa Phi Forum, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

Phi Kappa Phi & Distance Education


McKenzie, Wendell H., Phi Kappa Phi Forum


It is hard to ignore the emergence of distance education in higher education. Even so, no honor society to my knowledge has systematically addressed pertinent issues related to quality, effectiveness, recognition of excellence, and other facets of this burgeoning student population. That is both interesting and odd, in my opinion. Arguably, Phi Kappa Phi has an obligation to do so because one of our operating principles is to recognize excellence wherever it exists.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The purpose of this article is to:

* Draw attention to our responsibilities as leaders of the academy as it relates to Phi Kappa Phi and distance education;

* Relate the journey that a major Phi Kappa Phi committee has taken in conceiving, researching, writing, and disseminating a white paper on distance learning; and

* Encourage you to read Phi Kappa Phi's white paper on distance learning.

In sum, this article asks you to think critically about the significance of distance education, especially as it relates to Phi Kappa Phi's role in this expanding dimension of higher education.

A SEED IS PLANTED

Society President Paul J. Ferlazzo deserves credit for recognizing a void; as a proponent of distance education, he recognized that no honor society has considered the implications of distance education in any comprehensive way.

Dr. Ferlazzo approached me, knowing that I have some experience in distance education, to determine my interest in chairing a Phi Kappa Phi committee to study this matter. I happily agreed to do so.

A COMMITTEE IS FORMED

President Ferlazzo established the Membership Opportunities Committee (MOC) made up of colleagues from throughout the country. The MOC members and their affiliations are given below:

* Dr. Wendell H. McKenzie (chair), North Carolina State University

* Dr. Yaw A. Asamoah, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

* Dr. Catherine Clark-Eich, Ohio Department of Education

* Dr. Paul J. Ferlazzo, Northern Arizona University

* Dr. Marilyn J. Musacchio, Spalding University

* Dr. Diane G. Smathers, Clemson University

* Dr. Perry A. Snyder, Executive Director, Phi Kappa phi

* Ms. Lourdes Barro, Associate Executive Director/Chief Financial Officer, Phi Kappa Phi

THE COMMITTEE'S EXECUTION OF ITS CHARGE

The MOC was asked to consider the following:

* Are chapters initiating their distance-education students?

* Are there issues and concerns that might constitute barriers to initiating distance-education students? What strategies might overcome such barriers?

* Should we be doing more for our distance-education Phi Kappa Phi students?

* Should we establish chapters, ceremonies, or activities that make greater use of the virtual environment to better engage our distance-education students?

* What opportunities or services should we provide them?

* How can we help them identify more strongly with Phi Kappa Phi?

* What skills and resources might they be able to provide for Phi Kappa Phi?

The MOC addressed these and many additional questions. For example, what does the research literature have to say about the quality of teaching/learning when delivered via distance education? Are distance-education programs accredited, and if so, by what agencies or bodies? Do potential employers perceive distance-education students as of lesser quality? Is that perception changing? To what extent has distance education grown in recent years? What are the predictions for its future?

The MOC met face-to-face for a weekend meeting early in the triennium to consider its charge, direction, and plan for executing its charge. A consensus emerged from that meeting as well as from numerous subsequent conference calls and e-mail exchanges that the MOC should research and write a scholarly piece on distance learning, that is, a white paper. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Phi Kappa Phi & Distance Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.