Baroque on the Water: Steve Morse Joins Deep Purple

By Resnicoff, Matt | Guitar Player, May 1995 | Go to article overview

Baroque on the Water: Steve Morse Joins Deep Purple


Resnicoff, Matt, Guitar Player


"They were rightfully cautious, and so was I," says Deep Purple guitarist Steve Morse about his swift courtship with his new bandmates, who called him out of the blue last summer. "One of the very first questions I asked my manager was, `Are these guys going to make me were funny clothes?'"

Morse could probably justify such concerns; he is, after all, the only major guitar hero ever to have shorn off his hair for a stint as a button-down commercial airline pilot. Now, with the completion of his own band's killer new disc Structural Damage, Steve is deep into pre-production with Purple, who have finally closed the book on the Ritchie Blackmore era after a year of uncertainty and several months of overseas work with temporary fill-in Joe Satriani. Shortly into rehearsals with Morse, they invited him to stay on for good. Even so, Morse says he will continue working with the Steve Morse Band.

Apart from their penchant for hanging out in Orlando, Florida--an easy 90 minutes from Steve's home--the legendary proto-metal group had incentive to seek out Morse, a wildly versatile composer and instrumentalist whose playing with the Steve Morse Band and Dixie Dregs earned him Titan status among readers of this magazine. What drew Morse to Purple? Their musicianship, he says, and their openness to new possibilities for their music. Steve puts them at a level with first-call studio players: effortlessly quick to create arrangements and shape new ideas into album-quality material. …

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