WOOLLY FOR YOU; (1) on the Catwalk: (From Far Left) Giles Deacon, Daks and Stella McCartney (2) CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Sienna Miller, Keira Knightley and Jude Law Need to Glam Up Their Cardies (3) CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Christina Ricci, Cameron Diaz and Jessica Alba Show How to Do It Right

Daily Mail (London), September 10, 2007 | Go to article overview

WOOLLY FOR YOU; (1) on the Catwalk: (From Far Left) Giles Deacon, Daks and Stella McCartney (2) CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Sienna Miller, Keira Knightley and Jude Law Need to Glam Up Their Cardies (3) CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Christina Ricci, Cameron Diaz and Jessica Alba Show How to Do It Right


Byline: Eilidh MacAskill

THE biggest style challenge this season isn't paying for that [pounds sterling]900 'It'bag or finding a way to wear highwaisted jeansit's trying to carry off an oversized knit without looking 10in wider or as ifyou've just run out for a pint of milk.

We'd all like to think we could waft about in slinky, multi-ply cashmere withthe casual, semi-rustic allure of a Toast catalogue. My favourite piece ofclothing is a 'vintage' (read 'old') multi-coloured, chunky wrap-cardigan byDries Van Noten that is supposed to channel a cool 1970s vibe. Alas, in realityit makes me resemble a paintsplattered Weeble and requires weekly workouts witha special bobbleremoving implement, making it more high-maintenance than thefamily cat.

On trend or not, the sad truth remains that nothing is as levelling as a chunkycableknit cardi. It looks easy and low-maintenance, but there's a fine linebetween 'slouchy cool' and 'grouchy grandad'.

This hasn't stopped designers from pulling out their oversized knittingneedles. London wonderboy Giles Deacon, clearly worried about draughts, wrappedhis models in the largest scarves in the Western world. Nor did he neglect thecraft for his debut collection for Daks, with Dennis The Menace jumpers andclever black cable-knits that snaked around the torso.

Betty Jackson, meanwhile, offered lovely slouchy pieces that frothed at theneck (fabulous for hiding double chins) while Vivienne Westwood, Topshop Uniqueand Paul Smith all investigated the oversized cardi. PERHAPS the bestcollections hailed from Stella McCartney (all thigh-length ski jumpers and dovegrey boyfriend knits) and Sonia Rykiel (her more flamboyant knitted concoctionswere tied at the neck and torso with floppy bows).

Rykiel, dubbed the Queen of Knits, explains: 'The knitwear trend is a fantasticway of being warm and sexy. The super-large coat and pullover gives theimpression of a sweet blanket you'd wear to feel protected.' So far, socatwalk. But how does it translate to everyday? After all, even celebritiesstruggle with the knit-one-pearl-one look.

Keira Knightley looks decidedly off-message in her sludgecoloured knit. Mindyou, she is an improvement on Jude Law, who resembles a disgruntled Englishteacher, while his ex Sienna Miller looks like she has been living rough. …

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WOOLLY FOR YOU; (1) on the Catwalk: (From Far Left) Giles Deacon, Daks and Stella McCartney (2) CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Sienna Miller, Keira Knightley and Jude Law Need to Glam Up Their Cardies (3) CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Christina Ricci, Cameron Diaz and Jessica Alba Show How to Do It Right
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