Business Schools Set Sights on Troops; Both Careers Require Critical Thinking, Leadership, Commitment

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 16, 2007 | Go to article overview

Business Schools Set Sights on Troops; Both Careers Require Critical Thinking, Leadership, Commitment


Byline: Amy Fagan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Leadership. Responsibility. Teamwork. These qualities are highly valued and encouraged in the U.S. military. They also come in very handy in the business world.

So, why not combine the two careers?

That's the view of MilitaryMBA, a network that helps military officers who are pursuing or thinking about pursuing MBA degrees, and the MBA Tour, a recruiting organization for business schools.

The link makes sense, said Peter von Loesecke, chief executive officer of MBA Tour. Military officers "have good leadership skills, good work ethic and employers want them," he said. As a result, so do business schools.

"Every top MBA school likes to bring military people in," said Greg Eisenbarth, executive director of MilitaryMBA.

The MBA Tour and Military MBA joined forces to hold a career fair Tuesday at the Washington Convention Center. A few dozen curious military officers heard from others like them about how an MBA could benefit their careers.

Business schools have long looked to the military - both active members, those transitioning out of service and those who have retired - as potential MBA candidates, Mr. von Loesecke and Mr. Eisenbarth said.

Mr. Eisenbarth said the numbers explain why. The average U.S. and European MBA salary level at the end of 2003 was $75,846. For those with military experience, the salary was $102,275, according to National Center for Education Statistics information collected by MilitaryMBA. …

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Business Schools Set Sights on Troops; Both Careers Require Critical Thinking, Leadership, Commitment
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