Hispanic Youth Are the U.S. Church's Best Investment

National Catholic Reporter, September 7, 2007 | Go to article overview

Hispanic Youth Are the U.S. Church's Best Investment


Public television's "Antiques Roadshow" surprises participants with the value of possessions long disregarded. A blanket over an easy chair is a priceless Navajo creation. A bookmark reveals a daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe.

Something similar occurred at the first Encuentro Nacional de Pastoral Juvenil Hispana (National Encounter for Hispanic Youth and Young Adult Ministry) in June 2006. Hispanic Youth and Young Adult Ministry, long unnoticed, may now be valued for three reasons:

* U.S. Catholics of child-bearing years are already 47 percent Hispanic.

* U.S. Hispanic Catholics have larger families than white, non-Hispanic Catholics.

* Although diminished, immigration of Hispanic Catholics to the United States is still strong.

Such demographics indicate that within a generation, Hispanics will be the majority of the U.S. church. And since the median age of Hispanics is only 25, a conclusion as startling as many from "Antiques Roadshow" is that one cannot do Hispanic ministry without including youth nor can one do Catholic youth ministry without including Hispanics.

The Encuentro's goal was to: "empower Hispanic young people into a more active, enthusiastic and influential participation in the life and mission of the church in the United States." One hundred and twenty nine dioceses delegated some 2,000 Hispanic young adult leaders to caucus concerning a prior countrywide reflection process involving thousands of young Latinos who concluded:

* We want to be American Catholics without losing our identity, rooted in the Spanish language and Latino cultures.

* We want stable families and that requires immigration reform favoring family unity.

* We want to finish our education and learn more about our faith.

* We want to be the bridge-building leaders between language and ethnic groups that our church needs.

* We want to contribute to the mission of the church and be part of decision-making at both parish and diocesan levels.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Survey results

Although a closing document will be officially published, Instituto Fe y Vida conducted a survey with participants. About half responded to the bilingual questionnaire. The results are not surprising for those in Hispanic ministry, but are startling to those who are not.

Despite its strategic importance, Hispanic youth and young adult ministry suffers from a chronic shortage of paid personnel, training resources, and other financial support. Among those surveyed, 65 percent completed at least high school and the majority (61 percent) is bilingual. However, these largely single lay leaders are virtually all volunteers!

The future of the church in the United States will be largely determined by our ability to form leaders, both clerical and lay, from this generation of Hispanics. Hence, wise stewards must ask: Why do we continue to invest disproportionate amounts of Catholic youth ministry resources in non-Hispanics? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hispanic Youth Are the U.S. Church's Best Investment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.