World Problems in Review: Tumbling into War

World Affairs, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

World Problems in Review: Tumbling into War


EARLY in August, with our attention turned principally to the coming sessions of the Interparliamentary Union at Oslo, we should have said there would be no war. The failures of innumerable so-called "incidents" to bring on a European war, any one of which would have meant such a war twenty-five years ago, we thought to be the focal tact of modern history. Reasons for those fortunate failures seemed to be many. There was the human instinct of self-preservation, the new consciousness of the uncertainties of the outcome of any war, the realization by the Central Powers that France and England were at last now prepared for any emergency. There was an apparent consciousness by the Axis Powers that they could not win a war. All the Powers remembered the experiences of the World War. There was a weariness of the war psychology, a longing for better trade relations and calmer, happier international relationships. It appears that there was a growing belief in the mind of Herr Hitler that America was in sympathy with France and England with its direct bearing upon the limited reserves within the Axis Powers. There was a great popular resistance to the whole theory of war. Those were some of the reasons why so many serious "incidents" had not brought about a general European debacle. Due mainly to the radio and the press, men and women everywhere knew that the increasing costs of armaments were tending toward the actual starvation of men, women and children, in the lower income groups. As Mr. John G. Winant, Director of the International Labor Organization, had said, "these costs are added to every loaf of bread we buy, to every acre of land we cultivate, and to the length of the day we labor to earn a living." Thus we dared to trust early in August in the reluctance of governments to bring on a war. On August 7 both Mr. Chamberlain and Lord Halifax were hopeful. Parliament did not hesitate to recess. We believed there would be no war.

And yet, on the morning of August 15 Representative Hamilton Fish, President of the United States Group of the Interparliamentary Union, reported to our delegates in Oslo that he had conferred with Mr. De Valera in Ireland, Lord Halifax in London, M. Daladier in Paris, and Herr von Ribbentrop in Berlin, and that he had been led to believe that a European war was imminent. We all found it difficult to believe that that could be true. When the Conference adjourned August 19, the delegates generally believed, at least hoped of course, that peace would be maintained.

Evidently they were mistaken, for soon dispatches began to fly. On August 23 King Leopold of Belgium felt moved to broadcast from his Royal Palace a stirring appeal for peace, speaking in behalf of the heads of the seven neutral states whose representatives had been meeting in Brussels. The King pointed out that armies were gathering for a horrible struggle which could benefit neither victors nor vanquished. He called attention to the fact that public opinion in all countries was alarmed, that lack of confidence reigned everywhere, that there was a prevailing fear of a conflict into which all might be directed in spite of their will to maintain their neutrality and their independence. He went on to say that there is no people which wants to send its children to their untimely death, that all the states have the same interests, but that time was getting short. The King added:

"We want peace with respect for the rights of all nations. It is our wish that the differences between nations should be submitted to conciliation in a spirit of good will. Tomorrow hundreds of millions of people will be hoping that the differences which separate heads of States may be settled by means of conciliation. Let those in whose hands rests the destiny of the peoples apply themselves to settle peacefully the differences which separate them."

On August 24 President Roosevelt was led to propose both to Germany and to Poland that they enter into direct discussions with a view to a specific solution of their disputes; that in the event of the failure of direct discussions they submit their differences to arbitration by a third and disinterested party. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

World Problems in Review: Tumbling into War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.