New Outlet for Comtemporary Christian Music

By Sonderman, Joe | St. Louis Journalism Review, September 2007 | Go to article overview

New Outlet for Comtemporary Christian Music


Sonderman, Joe, St. Louis Journalism Review


F Scott Fitzgerald once said, There are no second acts in American lives."

But that's not always true, as shown by the cases of Don Imus and a pair of local radio personalities. Imus, was fired by CBS after making sexist and racist comments about the Rutgers women's basketball team. He has now settled with CBS, a deal which allows him to make a comeback at a new station. He still laces a lawsuit by one of the members of the Rutgers team that he insulted.

In a previous column, I blasted the return of "DJ Silly Asz" and "DJ Kaos" to the St. Louis airwaves. They were fired from Clear Channel's KATZ (100.3 FM) after joking with their morning drive audience about violent encounters with police officers just after the murder of Kirkwood police officer William McEntee. They got a second chance, returning to the airwaves on WHHT (104.1 FM).

A phone call from a veteran St. Louis broadcaster made me realize that I was wrong and everyone deserves a chance to make a living. Steve Byes has been on the air here for 27 years, and rightly points out that Silly Asz and Kaos are not the first personalities to make a stupid remark and make a comeback. On May 10, 1993, Steve Shannon and D.C. Chymes (real names: Terrence Trawick and Isaiah Wilhelm) had one of the top morning shows in St. Louis. But that morning on WKBQ (104.1 FM), they told a black woman caller she was "acting like a n ..." when she complained about their on-air attitude. They then proceeded to tell the audience that there should be no museums or TV shows devoted to blacks unless there could be exclusive white museums too.

The duo took a job in Denver, but the fallout from the remark followed them there. When they returned here from their banishment, even the NAACP agreed that the protests should end. Steve and D.C., Kaos and Imus were all punished for their remarks. Once is enough.

Kaos and Silly Asz only spent a short time in morning drive time upon their return. They have been shifted to the 6-10 p.m. slot after WHHT signed on with the syndicated Ricky Smiley Show. The actor and comedian's show is based at KBFB in Dallas.

Sports stations shuffle

You need a scorecard to keep track of the changes at the sports radio stations. The latest shuffle finds Brian McKenna and Joe Deniro back together as hosts of the morning show on KFNS (590 AM, 100.7 FM). They had worked together on Rams broadcasts on KLOU (103.3 FM) and hosted "Midday Mayhem" on KSLG (1380 AM).

Deniro says the new show "will focus on sports, but the format is wide open.... If there are sports to talk about, we will talk about it. But if there aren't, we will talk about something else."

Deniro says you can expect to hear "guy talk," entertainment, pop culture and "things guys hanging out in a bar talk about." As an example, he cites a potential feature called "Are you smarter than a stripper," featuring the finest minds from the Sauget Ballet.

Deniro and McKenna will be joined by another former KSLG broadcaster, Sarah Dayley. Sarah is the daughter of former Cardinals pitcher Ken Dayley. She will provide regular sports and entertainment updates. Deniro says the show will "try to look at the lighter side of everything.... We don't take ourselves too seriously.... We plan to be the voice of the fan."

Jeff Gordon and Jeff Vernetti are also moving over from KSLG. In an arrangement that is becoming more and more common as stations slash budgets, the two Jeffs are paying for their air time. They will sell some of their own advertising. Bob Fescoe, who was holding down the morning slow on KFNS, will become the Rams reporter.

Christian music

Stel Pontikes, host of "The Answer Radio Show" Sunday nights on KYKY (98.1 FM) has let us know that there is a new outlet for contemporary Christian music in St. Louis. Stel has been tapped to take charge of KEZK-HD2 with a format of "faith-based music" that will also feature artists who may be better known on the contemporary side. …

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