Perceived Organisational Justice as a Predictor of Employees' Motivation to Participate in Training

By Kang, Dae-seok | Research and Practice in Human Resource Management, June 2007 | Go to article overview

Perceived Organisational Justice as a Predictor of Employees' Motivation to Participate in Training


Kang, Dae-seok, Research and Practice in Human Resource Management


ABSTRACT

Employees' training motivation arising from their judgements of justice can be a critical asset that a business has for gaining a sustained competitive advantage over rivals. This study sought to examine the effect of three (distributive, procedural, and interactional) justice perceptions in predicting employees' motivation to participate in training activities. On the basis of theoretical linkages between the constructs, full mediation and partial mediation models by perceived benefits of training were developed. The models were tested using SEM (Structural Equation Modelling) on responses from 302 nurses of four public hospitals in the Republic of Korea. The results showed the partial mediation model is a dominant model. Implications and limitations of the current study and directions for future work are discussed.

INTRODUCTION

Training activity remains a very large part of human resource development (HRD) practice (Nordhaug 1989). As a planned attempt by an organisation to facilitate employee learning, training enhances individual competency by increasing employees' skills (Gritz 1993) and supporting career advancement (Tharenou 1997). Furthermore, organisational training activities are recognised as being able to become sources of competitive advantage (Barney 1995) through their impact on employees' productivity (Ng & Siu 2004) and their contributions to business objectives (Dobson & Tosh 1998). However, training alone is not the answer to a sustained competitive advantage for organisations. Training motivation is a key component of helping employees to become the engine of an organisation and make significant differences. If training is to be connected with individual and organisational performance, employees must be motivated and the continuous pursuit of development activities by individuals can be a key aspect in attaining training effectiveness in organisations (Noe 1986). Indeed, the training literature has not only recognised training motivation as one of the most important predictors for actual training participation (Mathieu, Tannenbaum & Salas 1992), but also established the construct as one key determinant of post training satisfaction, and the transfer of knowledge acquired to the work situation (Baldwin & Ford 1988, Ford, Kozlowski, Kraiger, Salas & Teachout 1997).

Similar to the topic of training motivation, a great deal of attention has been given to the topic of workplace fairness that has a motivational attribute beyond the reactive quest for equity (Campbell & Pritchard 1976). As a popular topic in human resource management, organisational behaviour, and Industrial/Organisational [I/O] psychology, it is also referred to as 'organisational justice' (Greenberg 1990). Organisational justice research, which focuses on the role of fairness in the workplace, has demonstrated that the perception of fairness is associated with a variety of individual work attitudes, such as satisfaction (DeConinck & Stilwell 2004) and commitment (Lowe & Vondanovich 1995), and individual behaviours, such as absenteeism (De Boer, Bakker, Syroit & Schaufeli 2002) and Citizenship behaviour (Organ 1990, Moorman 1991).

Indeed, the employees' motivation to learn and a desire for fair treatment are deeply rooted in human nature and inherent elements of organisations. As such, these core values can impact organisational effectiveness by shaping human resource practices and employee attitudes towards them. There has, however, been little research on the association between organisational justice and training motivation. Even these studies have largely focused on the methods and settings to maximise performance in training programmes while generally ignoring the importance of training context results from strategic HR coordination. For example, Quinones (1995) found a significant positive relationship between fairness perceptions and motivation to learn in a conceptual model developed to examine pre training motivational effects. …

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