Publishing under Adverse Conditions: Oklahoma Business Newspaper, with the Help of a Nearby Daily, Misses Only One Edition after Bomb Blast Damages Its Pressroom

By Fitzgerald, Mark | Editor & Publisher, May 20, 1995 | Go to article overview

Publishing under Adverse Conditions: Oklahoma Business Newspaper, with the Help of a Nearby Daily, Misses Only One Edition after Bomb Blast Damages Its Pressroom


Fitzgerald, Mark, Editor & Publisher


AT FIRST LARRY Fisk thought it was some kind of gas explosion.

And then the conference room where he sat with other managers was filled with shards of glass from the windows. Down the hall a light fixture fell on a reporter. Two paste-up artists lay seriously injured on the floor of the composing room.

It was 9:04 a.m. Wednesday, April 19, and the homemade truck bomb that had destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma city had also devastated the offices of Journal Record Publishing, publisher of the 92-year-old daily Journal Record, a business newspaper.

Virtually all the editorial, photocomposition and printing facilities of Journal Record Publishing's many enterprises were housed in the 92-year-old Journal Record Building, across the street from the federal building.

And once the company's 175 employees were safely out of the building -- four of them were taken directly to the hospital, and all were released within a few days -- Journal Record managers scrambled to rebuild.

Fortunately, it was quickly determined that the building itself was structurally sound.

But that didn't mean much, said Journal Record president and general manager Larry Fisk.

"The interior is so torn out that it is an open question whether we will be able to return," Fisk said.

The explosion's worst damage occurred in a relatively new addition to the building that housed the Journal Record's production facilities for the company's various publications. In addition to the 3,600-circulation daily business newspaper, the company publishes Tinker Take-Off, the 30,000-free-distribution weekly for Tinker Air Force Base; several shoppers; and several editions of the Auto Trader. The company also prints all documents for the Oklahoma Legislature and is a commercial printer.

At the time of the explosion, the wing housed two web presses, a sixunit Heidelberg-Harris V-15 and an eight-unit Heidelberg-Harris V-15-D with four splicers. In addition, the company had eight sheet-fed presses.

While some of the sheet-fed presses were accessible to workers and only slightly damaged, Fisk said, the two web presses were buried in rubble.

That Wednesday, the day of the explosion, the Journal Record newspaper missed an edition for the first time in its 92 years. But that day also demonstrated a spirit of cooperation by the newspaper industry, Fisk said.

"Everybody has been so helpful, just leaving us keys so we can come and go. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Publishing under Adverse Conditions: Oklahoma Business Newspaper, with the Help of a Nearby Daily, Misses Only One Edition after Bomb Blast Damages Its Pressroom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.