A Successful Induction into the Teaching Profession: For the New Career and Technical Education Teacher, a Teacher Induction Program and Peer Mentoring Can Make the First Year a Much More Positive Experience

By Cochran, Lori; Reese, Susan | Techniques, September 2007 | Go to article overview

A Successful Induction into the Teaching Profession: For the New Career and Technical Education Teacher, a Teacher Induction Program and Peer Mentoring Can Make the First Year a Much More Positive Experience


Cochran, Lori, Reese, Susan, Techniques


The teacher most likely to leave the profession is the new teacher, according to much of the latest research. A recent report on research into teacher recruitment and retention by the Education Commission of the States (ECS) notes that teacher attrition is most severe among teachers who have been in the classroom for only four to five years. Other statistics reported by ECS that are of interest to career and technical education (CTE) teachers: attrition is greater among middle school and high school teachers than among elementary school teachers, but retention rates of alternative-route teachers are comparable to--or may even exceed--those of teachers who entered the profession through traditional preparation programs.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

There is some evidence to suggest, however, that teacher induction and mentoring programs can play a role in keeping new teachers in the profession by assisting them in navigating what can sometimes be the rough waters of their first years of teaching.

Helping New Teachers in Missouri

The Missouri Center for Career Education (MCCE) has established teacher support systems intended to help new teachers succeed. These include the New Teacher Institute (NTI) and a two-year induction program that includes mentoring for the new teacher. NTI has been in existence for more than 40 years and is designed to be a sort of teacher boot camp. it helps mostly individuals who are coming to the teaching profession from business and industry--and do not have a BS degree in teacher education--to become better prepared to teach in the classroom.

As a yearlong comprehensive professional development program, NTI has three main goals: to develop the pedagogical skills of new CTE teachers: to identify resources to support new CTE teachers; and to establish a support network for new CTE teachers. While most of those attending NTI will be teaching health occupations or trade and industrial education, the rest may be teachers in any other CTE area. The purpose el NTI is to teach then? to be hotter teachers no matter what their content area.

Support Through Mentoring

The newer element of the Missouri induction program is the reentering aspect. It was added when the Missouri Department o[ Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) awarded a grant in 2003 to the University of Central Missouri (UCM) to establish MCCE. The center is located within the College of Education, Department of Career and Technology Education at UCM in Warrensburg.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The Missouri Career Education Mentoring Program pairs experienced teachers with new teachers. The mentor and protege. work together throughout the school year. While NTI puts new teachers from various areas of CTE together, the reentering program pairs those in the same content areas. There are also content experts for the different fields of CTE. For example, Lori Cochran, the director of NTI, also serves as one of the trade and industrial content experts. The content experts facilitate delivery of the program and the content, and oversee the mentors and new teachers to make sure they are successfully completing the structured experiences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Successful Induction into the Teaching Profession: For the New Career and Technical Education Teacher, a Teacher Induction Program and Peer Mentoring Can Make the First Year a Much More Positive Experience
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.