The Head Turners of Art; Turner Picture Gallery: A Dozen Past Winners Gather at the Tate Britain Unveiling of the Exhibition Which Marks Almost a Quarter of a Century of Contemporary Art. Back Row, from Left, Martin Creed, Grenville Davy, Wolfgang Tillmans, Antony Gormley, Richard Long, Keith Tyson. Front Row, Grayson Perry, Malcolm Morley, Rachel Whiteread, Anish Kapoor, Howard Hodgkin and Tomma Abts

The Evening Standard (London, England), October 2, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Head Turners of Art; Turner Picture Gallery: A Dozen Past Winners Gather at the Tate Britain Unveiling of the Exhibition Which Marks Almost a Quarter of a Century of Contemporary Art. Back Row, from Left, Martin Creed, Grenville Davy, Wolfgang Tillmans, Antony Gormley, Richard Long, Keith Tyson. Front Row, Grayson Perry, Malcolm Morley, Rachel Whiteread, Anish Kapoor, Howard Hodgkin and Tomma Abts


Byline: LOUISE JURY

THESE are the people who made the British public fall in love withcontemporary art.

Turner Prize winners all, they gathered at Tate Britain last night as thegallery unveiled an exhibition of nearly a quarter-century of paintings, videoand sculpture previously honoured by the award.

When Malcolm Morley, a London artist who moved to America in his twenties, wasnamed the first winner in 1984, he did not even attend the ceremony.

But Morley, 76, flew in from his home in Long Island, New York, to join thecelebrations alongside his successors, including Antony Gormley, Anish Kapoor,Rachel Whiteread and Grayson Trafalgar sculpture finally Perry. Many absentees,such as 2004 winner Jeremy Deller, were missing because of their successfulinternational careers.

Michael Craig-Martin, the artist who taught Young British Artists such asfinally unveiled 1995 winner Damien Hirst, said: "It's amazing how much of thework looks really great." His major lament was not having shortlisted artists,who include Tracey Emin and the Chapman brothers, in the unveiled next monthretrospective. Others had their own concerns. Morley, who was born in Highgateand raised in Twickenham, said he was surprised how few paintings there were.

But Whiteread, 44, said: "I think it's certainly been a valuable contributionto bringing contemporary art to the forefront of people's cultural agendas, soit's been great for that." The prize has often proved controversial.

There were rows over Emin's unmade bed and early video work was not accepted asit is now. Critics such as the Stuckists still protest at the art the prize hasfavoured.

However, Stephen Deuchar, Tate Britain's director, said the outraged postbaghad gradually declined.

Most commentators say the prize has transformed public opinion and done much toencourage debate and understanding just as it was hoped it would. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Head Turners of Art; Turner Picture Gallery: A Dozen Past Winners Gather at the Tate Britain Unveiling of the Exhibition Which Marks Almost a Quarter of a Century of Contemporary Art. Back Row, from Left, Martin Creed, Grenville Davy, Wolfgang Tillmans, Antony Gormley, Richard Long, Keith Tyson. Front Row, Grayson Perry, Malcolm Morley, Rachel Whiteread, Anish Kapoor, Howard Hodgkin and Tomma Abts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.