Where Do Hispanics Stand?

Diverse Issues in Higher Education, September 20, 2007 | Go to article overview

Where Do Hispanics Stand?


Where do Hispanics Stand?

Percentage Distribution of College Presidents,
by Race and Institution Type: 2006

American College President: American
College President Study: 2007 Edition

Race/Ethnicity        Doctorate    Master's   Baccalaureate

White, non-Hispanic     88.7%       87.1%         86.9%
Black, non-Hispanic      6.2%        6.7%         8.3%
Asian, non-Hispanic      .5%         0.7%          .2%
American Indian           0%        0.24%          0%
Other                    2.1%        1.0%         1.2%
Hispanic                 2.6%        4.3%         3.4%
Total                    100%        100%         100%

                                   Special
Race/Ethnicity        Associates    Focus         Total

White, non-Hispanic     86.1%       84.8%         86.5%
Black, non-Hispanic      4.9%        2.9%         5.8%
Asian, non-Hispanic       1%         2.2%          .9%
American Indian         0.42%       3.99%         .74%
Other                    1.5%        2.2%         1.5%
Hispanic                 6.1%        4.0%         4.6%
Total                    100%        100%         100%

National H.S. Graduation Rates by Race and Gender (Percent)

Race/Ethnicity           National   Female   Male

White                      74.9       77     70.8
Black                      50.2      56.2    42.8
Hispanic                   53.2      58.5     48
American Indian            51.1      51.4     47
Asian/Pacific Islander     76.8       80     72.6
All Students                68        72     64.1

Source: The Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, 2004

Status Dropout Rates of 16- Through 24-year-
olds, by Race/Ethnicity: October 1975 to 2005

Year    Total   White   Black   Hispanic

1975    13.9    11.4    22.9      29.2
1985    12.6    10.4    15.2      27.6
1995     12      8.6    12.1       30
2005     9.4      6     10.4      22.4

(1) Total includes other race/ethnicity categories not separately
shown.

* Due to rounding, numbers may add up to more than 100.

NOTE: The status dropout rate is the percentage of 16- through 24-
year-olds who are not enrolled in high school and who lack a high
school credential. A high school credential includes a high school
diploma or equivalent credential such as a General Educational
Development (GED) certificate. Estimates beginning in 1987 reflect
new editing procedures for cases with missing data on school
enrollment items. Estimates beginning in 1992 reflect new wording
of the educational attainment item. Estimates beginning in 1994
reflect changes due to newly instituted computer-assisted
interviewing. See supplemental note 7 for more information.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Current
Population Survey (CPS), October Supplement, 1972-2005

Percentage Distribution of
Presidents, by Gender and
Race/Ethnicity: 2006

American College President: American College
President Study: 2007 Edition

                    Percent

Women and Men
Black                 5.9
Asian American        .9
White                86.4
Hispanic              4.5
American Indian       .7
Other                 1.5
Total                 100

Men
Black                 5.3
Asian American        .9
White                 88
Hispanic              3. … 

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