Rights - Universal and Indivisible

The Middle East, April 1995 | Go to article overview

Rights - Universal and Indivisible


Womens rights are human rights and human rights are not only universal, they are also indivisible. With these bold words Amnesty International launched a major worldwide campaign to put the human rights of women on the public and government agendas in the run up to the United Nations conference on women, scheduled for Beijing in September.

For millions of women the 1990s have meant terror. Today what unites them internationally - transcending barriers of race, class culture, religion, nationality and ethnic origin - is their vulnerability. Most of the civilian casualties of war are women and children; most of the world's poor are women and children. The great failure of the world community of governments is not just that they have been unable to guarantee women their social, economic and cultural rights - the theme of the forthcoming UN conference - but that they have been unable to prevent and in some cases have sanctioned the violation of womens civil and political rights: the right not to be raped, tortured, killed, made to "disappear", arbitrarily detained or imprisoned.

In a fragmented and volatile world, all human rights are under threat. During conflicts - whether international wars, civil wars, or low intensity insurgencies - the human rights of non-combatants are invariably at risk. Torture, massacres, "disappearances" become mere tactics; human rights are secondary to military advantage. Women suffer especially. They are caught up in conflicts largely not of their making. They become the butt of reprisal killings. They already make up most of the world's refugees and displaced people. Often left to raise families by themselves, they are raped and sexually abused with impunity, their bodies considered almost as spoils of war.

Rape and the abuse of women have been reported in almost every modern situation of armed conflict, whether internal or international in nature, Amnesty comments. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rights - Universal and Indivisible
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.