United Nations Day 2007; Global Health: A Critical Component to Development

Manila Bulletin, October 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

United Nations Day 2007; Global Health: A Critical Component to Development


TRUE to its mission, the United Nations has worked hard in the 62 years since it was established, alleviating suffering in every part of the world and strengthening the mechanisms of international cooperation. It has taken some big steps forward in the common struggle of all nations for development, security, and human rights. But with the demands from all fronts, from peacekeeping to humanitarian assistance to health, the United Nations today is being called upon to do more than ever before, even as the resources to perform these missions grow scarce.

Behind the increasing interconnectedness promised by globalization are global decisions, policies, and practices that are influenced or formulated by the rich and powerful nations. These leave poor nations powerless and result in a few nations getting wealthier while the majority struggle. Leaders have gathered time and again to forge a common response to these challenges to reduce hunger and poverty, promote human rights, build lasting peace in war-torn countries, save populations from genocide and other heinous crimes, fight for human rights, fight terrorism in all forms, and tackle the issues of climate change, nuclear proliferation, and disarmament.

It is especially on these topics that a new world solidarity is required in order for nations to achieve the Millennium Goals, which will in turn depend upon the ability of the United Nations to act collectively to promote a moral code of globalization and social dialogue on a world scale. …

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United Nations Day 2007; Global Health: A Critical Component to Development
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