CD Design: Integrating Art, Music and Information Technology

By Lukawecky, Kristine | Arts & Activities, November 2007 | Go to article overview

CD Design: Integrating Art, Music and Information Technology


Lukawecky, Kristine, Arts & Activities


[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

What is more important to eighth-grade students than their music and their friends? Not much!

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

With this in mind, our school's Instrumental Music Teacher, Mike Elmer, and I decided to collaborate on a project that would provide students with an opportunity to work with their friends to create a high-quality musical keepsake of their eighth-grade graduating year, while integrating expectations from the music, visual arts and information technology curriculums.

We envisioned our students composing, performing and recording a music CD, and then using computer software to create a professional-looking cover for the CD. (This project is also appropriate for high-schoolers.)

In order to complete a project of this scale, however, Mike and I realized that we would need additional funds to purchase new equipment, as well as some consumable items. We applied for a grant from the Halton Learning Foundation, which raises money to support special projects in schools in our region. Our application was accepted and we received a very generous grant to purchase a digital recording station, a microphone, a digital camera, a color ink-jet printer, blank CDs and CD cases.

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

THE MUSIC OF ART Mike decided to have the students compose a musical selection in a style of their choice. The open-ended nature of the assignment appealed to most students. Some chose to create instrumental selections, while others wrote lyrics for their songs. Many worked in small groups of two or three, and a few chose to complete solos. Students wrote, performed and digitally recorded their music compositions. Mike then burned these compositions as tracks onto a class CD. Each eighth-grade student then received a copy of the class CD.

In my visual arts class, the students each designed a cover for their personal copy of the class CD. They began by creating a plan for their project that identified the mood, feeling or theme they were trying to communicate, and the elements and principles of design they would use to help convey these concepts. For example, one student, who wanted to create a CD cover that reflected the fun, funky nature of the eighth-grade class, focused on the principles of proportion and variety. She distorted the proportions of the people on her cover to make it humorous and used bright colors.

The students actually found this planning stage much more difficult than I expected. Many of them had a hard time visualizing what their final product would look like because they did not fully understand the capabilities of the software. Consequently, the next time I do this project I will be sure to give a full demonstration of the software before students begin their plans, and I will share a large range of student examples with my class.

SHUTTERBUGS After completing their plans, students took turns using a digital camera to take at least one original photo. They photographed a wide range of subject matter, including musical instruments, friends, flowers, jewelry and even a toilet! Some brought special objects from home to photograph, while others used objects found around the school.

The students really enjoyed working with their friends to complete this part of the project and had a hard time keeping their photography sessions to a reasonable length. We only had two digital cameras to work with, the one purchased by the Halton Learning Foundation and my own personal camera, which meant that it was important that students make efficient use of their time with the camera. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CD Design: Integrating Art, Music and Information Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.