Convenience Stores Get New Lease of Life: Research Shows That Popular Belief Is Wrong in Forecasting Terminal Decline, Says Prof Neil Wrigley

By Wrigley, Prof Neil | New Statesman (1996), October 8, 2007 | Go to article overview

Convenience Stores Get New Lease of Life: Research Shows That Popular Belief Is Wrong in Forecasting Terminal Decline, Says Prof Neil Wrigley


Wrigley, Prof Neil, New Statesman (1996)


Popular belief has it that convenience stores are in a state of decline and that independent stores are vanishing from our high streets. The entry of supermarkets into the convenience sector has come at a time when there are reports the decline is stronger. However, recent research for Tesco by the University of Southampton's GeoData Institute, shows that the convenience store sector has been growing strongly in UK shopping centres in recent years and that new independent stores are responsible for more than half that growth. This article provides a summary of the submission made to the Competition Commission on the back of this research by Professor Neil Wrigley (University of Southampton), Professor Graham Clarke (University of Leeds) and the GeoData Institute (University of Southampton).

In May 2007, the GeoData Institute at the University of Southampton was commissioned by Tesco Plc to undertake an analysis of changes in the structure of the retail landscape in more than 1,000 shopping centres in the UK using the annual/biennial shopping centre plans compiled by Experian Goad.

The work mirrored work by the Competition Commission published in a Working Paper in June 2007. However, the GeoData Institute research refined that work in several ways, most significantly by assessing 'like-for-like' increases and decreases in convenience store numbers, by factoring in changes in the size of shopping centres.

The research showed a dramatic like-for-like increase in convenience store numbers. Between October 2000 and October 2006 the GeoData Institute study revealed a 70.4% rise in the number of convenience stores across the shopping centres studied. The findings corroborate the results of the Competition Commission working paper, confirming significant growth in the convenience-store sector in this large sample of UK shopping centres, indicative perhaps of shifting lifestyles and patterns of consumer behaviour in towns and cities in the UK.

Breaking down these like-for-like changes in convenience store numbers, the GeoData study revealed that most of the increase in convenience store numbers (56.9%) was accounted for by non-affiliated independent retailers. Only 23.8% of the growth in store numbers was accounted for by so-called 'symbol' group retailers and 19.2% came from multiple retailers and cooperatives.

Another interesting facet of the GeoData work was the regional spread of the growth figures. The largest overall increases in convenience-store numbers occurred in London and the South East (56.1%), whilst only 8.7% of the increase in store numbers occurred in the North East, Northern Ireland, Yorkshire & Humberside and Wales combined. The largest percentage growth in independent retailers took place in the North West and London (70%+). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Convenience Stores Get New Lease of Life: Research Shows That Popular Belief Is Wrong in Forecasting Terminal Decline, Says Prof Neil Wrigley
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.