Anti-Women Literature Found at 3 City Mosques; Exclusive

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), November 4, 2007 | Go to article overview

Anti-Women Literature Found at 3 City Mosques; Exclusive


Byline: BY JEANETTE OLDHAM

EXTREMIST literature calling for the oppression of women and persecution of non-believers has been found in three Birmingham mosques.

Researchers discovered hate-filled books and pamphlets on sale at Central Mosque, in Highgate, and Green Lane and Salafi mosques, both in Small Heath.

Undercover staff from The Policy Exchange think-tank spent a year visiting nearly 100 Muslim religious institutions across the country.

They found extremist material for sale, either openly or secretly, in a quarter of the venues.

Hardline material discovered in Birmingham called, in particular, for the subjugation of women and alienation of moderate Muslims.

It also urged Muslims to lead separate lives from 'non-believers' and said it was permissible to 'spill someone's blood' if they abandon their Islamic faith.

The researchers claim much of the literature discovered nationally is written by Saudi Arabian linked religious groups, including the Wahhabite organisation, and published by official or semi-official Saudi institutions.

Some mosques visited by the undercover Muslim teams during 2006 and 2007 are also said to be Saudi-funded.

The Policy Exchange report, called The Hijacking of British Islam: How Extremist Literature is Subverting Britain's Mosques, was written by Denis MacEoin, an Islamic studies expert at Newcastle University.

He told the Sunday Mercury some books discovered in Birmingham were particularly anti-feminist and called for the persecution of non-Muslims.

Material on sale at Central Mosque states there are clear limits to what a woman can do - and emphasise that her main duties should be in the home.

It says: "We do not forbid a woman to do things outside her house provided this is in conformity with the following rules... she must have a need to do these things after she has completed her housework, which is her basic work.

"There is no harm in her attending classes at the mosque or somewhere similar, but she must stay hidden and be kept away from men."

The same literature also stresses that Muslim women are forbidden from travelling in a car with a man - as in a taxi - or attending a male doctor.

It states: "A woman riding in a car with a man unchaperoned is an obvious blameworthy act. It entails many corruptions which cannot be taken lightly.

"Some women and their guardians take the matter of women visiting male doctors lightly; they use the excuse of their need for treatment. This is a grave sin and a great danger."

Other shock passages also declare that even listening to singing can turn women into prostitutes. …

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