Seeking the Fullness of Mary

National Catholic Reporter, October 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

Seeking the Fullness of Mary


Nowhere does the doctrinal and devotional life of the Catholic church combine to provoke more passion and piety than when the discussion turns to Mary. That's Mary, as in the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, the fruit of Immaculate Conception, the young woman startled by the news delivered by an angel at the Annunciation. Mary, the expectant mother who journeyed to visit her elderly, expectant cousin, Elizabeth, at the Visitation. Mary, the woman taken into heaven at the Assumption, and Mary Queen of Heaven. She is patroness of the Americas and the subject of devotional celebrations around the world. So it is fitting in October, the second month traditionally devoted to her, to reflect upon the complexities of Mary's presence within the Catholic faith.

The role of "woman" in religion predates Christianity. The need to balance masculine and feminine principles is integral to every spirituality. Not surprisingly, our church, which is unapologetically patriarchal in its theology and male in its official leadership, needs and prizes this special woman.

Yet if Mary is in fact a central figure in the life of the church and in the spiritual lives of all the baptized, there is good reason to insist that she not be held captive by any one group or one theological approach.

Over the centuries, an expanding number of feasts on the liturgical calendar keep before our eyes Mary's Immaculate Heart and her Most Holy Rosary. Mary's medals and scapulars, octaves and novenas, and beyond these, quasi-approved appearances at Lourdes, Fatima and Medjugorje are all linked to miracles and reminders that God loves us.

But to question or nuance any part of what has become a devotional Marian spirituality in the life of the church is to risk being misunderstood. Like sensitive family matters, when Catholics discuss Mary we avoid Protestant objections or any psycho-social-sexual themes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Seeking the Fullness of Mary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.