Euthanasia in Britain

The Hastings Center Report, May-June 1995 | Go to article overview

Euthanasia in Britain


Two recent British court cases inolving the deaths of patients have caught the public imagination here. The one was that of Tony Bland, a teenager in persistent vegetative state (PVS) whose doctors were authorized to withdraw parenteral nutrition; the other that of Nigel Cox, a doctor who admitted giving potassium chloride to a patient to keep her from suffering further. Partly as a result of these cases, and partly in consideration of decisions taken in the United States and the Netherlands, the government recently established a House of Lords Select Committee on Medical Ethics, which was directed

to consider the ethical, legal and

clinical implications of a person's

right to withhold consent to life-prolonging

treatment, and the

position of persons who are no

longer able to give or withhold

consent; and to consider whether

and in what circumstances actions

that have as their intention or

likely consequence the shortening

of another person's life may

be justified ... [and] the likely

effects of changes in the law or

medical practice on society as a

whole. (House of Lords Paper 2 1) The committee began its work on 16 February 1993; took written and oral testimony from a host of governmental agencies, professional and religious bodies, voluntary organizations, and individuals; and issued its report a year to the day after it was formed. Their unanimous opinion was that while there should be no change in the law to permit euthanasia, treatment that will add nothing to a patient's well-being as a person ought not to be given.

The report provides a summary of the testimony received by the committee and its recommendations. These latter fall into four areas: voluntary euthanasia and involuntary killing, treatment-limiting decisions about incompetent patients, advance directives, and resource allocation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Euthanasia in Britain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.