'WSJ Journal' Editorial Slams Hillary

By Strupp, Joe | Editor & Publisher, November 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

'WSJ Journal' Editorial Slams Hillary


Strupp, Joe, Editor & Publisher


The Wall Street Journal editorial page, never a huge fan of the Clintons, took what may be its harshest shot yet at Hillary Clinton today, with an editorial that called here everything from a double-talker to a truth-evader.

"In the 1990s, 'Clintonesque' became a by-word for political double-speak. ...," the editorial began. Later it noted, "But with another Clinton running as if she's all but a sure thing for the White House, Clintonesque is once again becoming a politically relevant adjective. ... The junior Senator from New York seems increasingly to have adopted her husband's political methods ... The result is that it's impossible to know what she believes about anything. ..." Much of the editorial focused on the recent MSNBC Democratic presidential debate, moderated by Brian Williams and Tim Russert of NBC News.

"The question of experience came up repeatedly, and Mrs. Clinton wasn't shy about citing her time as first lady as a main qualification to be President. She was less forthcoming about the records of her time in the White House, however," the Journal opined. "Mr. Russert asked: 'In order to give the American people an opportunity to make a judgment about your experience, would you allow the National Archives to release the documents about your communications with the President, the advice you gave, because, as you well know, President Clinton has asked the National Archives not to do anything until 2012? …

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