Bureau of Electronic Publishing Releases Multimedia Titles in Library Network Versions

Information Today, June 1995 | Go to article overview

Bureau of Electronic Publishing Releases Multimedia Titles in Library Network Versions


The Bureau of Electronic Publishing has announced that its four top-selling, award-winning multimedia CD-ROM titles have been released in special packages for school and public libraries. Great Literature Plus, Monarch Notes, Multimedia World History and Multimedia US History are available with either 10-user or 2-9-user network licenses and free loaner copies at discount rate. Libraries may now allow many users to scan and search entire library collections at once for specific topics or interests and automate their research.

The benefits to libraries have been summed up by Charlene Boom, a librarian in Wisconsin's Prairie du Chien Area High School District, which has used network versions of the Bureau's titles for over a year. "We have 12 CD players in the library that are networked all over the school - to our three media labs and seven computers in the library. Consequently, over 400 classes have used CD-ROM titles in their classwork research. I've been a librarian for over 30 years, and I know that the technology has completely changed the way students do research. Years ago, they'd go to the library, check out a book on the topic, and do a book report. Today, their topics become `key word searches' on the disk. They can get information on the topic from hundreds, even thousands, of magazines and books! That has to teach appreciation for multiple points of view and reasoned, critical thinking. The student is getting a better education." Bureau of Electronic Publishing CEO Larry Shiller said, "These core titles have been recognized as a unique combination of subject and source comprehensiveness, and inventive, creative multimedia. Now libraries can use these titles as network packages at terrific cost savings."

Alona with multimedia galleries composed of films, video, music, photo libraries, art and animation - Great Literature Plus holds a world library of 1,900 works from 1890 classic authors. …

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