Quality Child Care: Defining Cities' Responsibility

By Noble, Nancy; Hudson, Dennis | Nation's Cities Weekly, May 22, 1995 | Go to article overview

Quality Child Care: Defining Cities' Responsibility


Noble, Nancy, Hudson, Dennis, Nation's Cities Weekly


"The level of quality at most child care centers does not meet children's needs for health, safety, warm relationships and learning," according to a recently reported, 18-month study conducted at child care centers in California, Connecticut, North Carolina, and Colorado.

The findings from "Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers" send a clear message to cities and the public that all may not be well."

The study states that 7 out of 10 centers provide only minimal quality. In those centers caring for infants and toddlers, only eight percent were providing good quality and forty percent were rated as less than minimal. (Please refer to accompanying box for summary of key points and information on how to order the study.

However, our informal survey of several municipal child care coordinators shows that cities are taking action to ensure that families have access to high quality, affordable child care. It is heartening to note that the cities contacted have vital programs in place that support and enhance the quality of child care services in their communities.

This survey of selected cities shows some common threads among those cities that have a child care initiative in place. The respondents indicate that these threads pull together to improve the quality and affordability of child care in their municipalities. The common threads are:

* training and technical assistance for child care providers

* recognition events for high quality child care programs.

* resource centers for parents, providers and the business community.

* child care referral services for parents and/or support for local referral agencies.

* collaborations and partnerships with businesses.

* financial assistance to parents.

* financial assistance to providers.

* in-kind services to providers.

* public awareness activities.

In answering our survey, several municipal child care coordinators offered advice to local government officials wishing to address the child care issues in their communities. Their responses echo many of the child care initiatives listed above.

Jackie Neel, Division Head for Child Care in Cambridge, Mass., believes that child care "must be an integral part of the municipal infrastructure. It needs to be recognized and supported on the same level as trash collection and street repairs and paving." Neel also believes that child care is "the best crime prevention method around."

The importance of having a child care coordinator was emphasized by Deb Ferrin, Child Care Coordinator for San Diego, Calif. She believes a coordinator can "help increase accessibility to high quality, affordable child care."

This emphasis on high quality and affordability was repeated by Barbara Kamara, Executive Director, Office of Early Childhood Development in Washington, D.C. "High quality, affordable and accessible child care options are essential to the general well- being of working parents," according to Kamara. "Employers should be invested with the responsibility for supporting child care through a variety of alternative methods."

However, employers often don't know where to turn for help. Frequently, cities and businesses form partnerships or collaboratives to deal with child care issues. Martha Daley, Director of the Office of Child Care Initiatives for Denver, Colo., believes the business community should be more involved with child care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Quality Child Care: Defining Cities' Responsibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.