Investigating What Went Wrong and Why: 'As It Turns out, Many of the Systemic Failures That Plagued the Gulf Coast during and after Katrina Should Have Been Predicted.'

By Bergal, Jenni | Nieman Reports, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

Investigating What Went Wrong and Why: 'As It Turns out, Many of the Systemic Failures That Plagued the Gulf Coast during and after Katrina Should Have Been Predicted.'


Bergal, Jenni, Nieman Reports


When the Center for Public Integrity hired me in November 2005, the mission was clear: to conduct an in-depth journalistic probe into one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, Hurricane Katrina. Some in the national media, including The New York Times and CNN, were doing excellent on-the-ground reporting, as were many small and midsized papers, especially The Times-Picayune in New Orleans and the Sun Herald in Biloxi/Gulfport, Mississippi. What this opportunity allowed for was several experienced reporters to examine the disaster not only in terms of what went wrong, but to ask why, and to ask whether aspects of what happened here--as a result of the storm and then during the long recovery from it--could happen again somewhere else.

Our findings would be published in a book entitled "City Adrift: New Orleans Before and After Katrina," divided into specific subject areas--environment, health care, housing and other critical topics. Its focus would be solely on New Orleans, a great American city that had been nearly destroyed. As an investigative journalist, I knew we'd want to rely on audits of government programs, congressional reports, and other public records so decision-making and mistakes made could be melded into the broader context of our storytelling. As it turns out, many of the systemic failures that plagued the Gulf Coast during and after Katrina should have been predicted; there is no shortage of reports and audits and testimony about similar breakdowns and failures by government agencies after previous disasters in other parts of the country.

My primary task was to find reporters either with specific expertise we'd need or with lots of experience in investigative journalism. I turned to a network of colleagues and peers to come up with some names, and in the end I hired five journalists to work on this project. The first one I brought on board was John McQuaid, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who had just taken a buyout from The Times-Picayune. He was the coauthor of a series in 2002 that predicted a Katrina-type storm would hit New Orleans. And he knew a lot about the Army Corps of Engineers and its history. He was the perfect person to write a chapter about the levees.

We also hired Frank Koughan, a freelancer who had spent eight years as an associate producer for CBS News's "60 Minutes." While he wasn't a print journalist, he knew a lot about investigative reporting and would be great at humanizing the story because of his TV background. He used those skills to write eloquently about housing and insurance.

We also were fortunate to bring Curtis Wilkie to the team. He was a long-time national political reporter for The Boston Globe and had written books. As a Mississippi native who lived part-time in the French Quarter, he understood New Orleans and Louisiana politics and was able to use his vast knowledge to write about it.

As I pulled together my team of reporters, I decided I wanted to report as well. With my background as an investigative health care reporter I examined the collapse of the health care system in New Orleans. I paid particular attention to the failure of the National Disaster Medical System, a federal program that is designed to swoop in and help triage and evacuate sick and injured people during a disaster when local health officials can't. …

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