Kerik Indicted

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

Kerik Indicted


Byline: Greg Pierce, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Kerik indicted

Bernard B. Kerik, a former New York police commissioner and protege of Republican presidential hopeful Rudolph W. Giuliani, was indicted on corruption charges yesterday, press reported, in a potential embarrassment for Mr. Giuliani's campaign.

Mr. Kerik, 52, and Mr. Giuliani, the former New York mayor, were also business partners. With Mr. Giuliani's backing, Mr. Kerik was nominated by President Bush in 2004 to be secretary of homeland security.

Mr. Kerik later withdrew his name from consideration after admitting he failed to pay Social Security taxes for a nanny and other embarrassing disclosures about his personal life surfaced. WABC television reported that a law-enforcement official said Mr. Kerik was expected to surrender today in Westchester County, just north of New York City, where a federal grand jury was investigating his finances and business dealings while on the city payroll, Reuters reported yesterday.

WNBC television said on its Web site that Mr. Kerik would be arraigned today.

Prosecutors planned to accuse Mr. Kerik of trying to influence a probe of a contractor with suspected links to organized crime, local press reported. The New York Times reported Wednesday that Mr. Kerik was likely to be indicted.

Mr. Giuliani was Mr. Kerik's longtime mentor, promoting the former police detective to a series of positions, including the chief of city jails.

Mr. Kerik was police commissioner in 2000 and 2001 and stood at Mr. Giuliani's side after the September 11 attacks.

Addressing a press conference in Dubuque, Iowa, yesterday, Mr. Giuliani responded briefly to questions about the expected indictment.

"In that particular case, I pointed out I made a mistake," the former mayor said. "I made a mistake in not clearing him effectively and I take responsibility for that. When you are mayor of New York, you make 100,000 decisions. Some of them you make wrong."

Punishment for 5

The Republican Party announced yesterday that it will follow through on its threat to punish five states for scheduling early nominating contests.

New Hampshire, Florida, South Carolina, Michigan and Wyoming will lose half of their delegates to the national convention, said Robert M. Duncan, chairman of the Republican National Committee.

RNC rules require the punishment for states that hold their nominating contests earlier than Feb. 5. Iowa, which plans to hold Republican caucuses Jan. 3, would not be penalized because the caucuses technically are not binding on convention delegates. Nevada, which plans to hold its caucuses Jan. 19, would not be penalized for the same reason, the Associated Press reports.

The RNC voted 121-9 yesterday to impose the penalties.

Mr. Duncan, who has final say over the matter, said he will abide by the vote.

California vs. EPA

California sued a federal agency yesterday to force a decision about whether the state can impose the nation's first greenhouse-gas emissions standards for cars and light trucks.

More than a dozen other states are poised to follow California's lead if it is granted the waiver from federal law.

Automakers oppose the move, saying it would force them to adapt to a patchwork of regulations.

The state's lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency was filed in U.S. District Court in Washington.

"Our future depends on us taking action on global warming right now," Gov. …

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