Ice Age Sent Shivers through the Tropics

By Monastersky, Richard | Science News, July 29, 1995 | Go to article overview

Ice Age Sent Shivers through the Tropics


Monastersky, Richard, Science News


Among climate scientists, the tropics have the reputation of unwavering stability. When the rest of the globe turned frosty during the last ice age, some 115,000 to 10,000 years ago, Earth's midsection seemed to weather the glacial epoch with little or no cooling.

But gathering evidence is shaking this appraisal by showing that parts of the tropics chilled substantially during the ice age. If duplicated at other sites, the new findings will remove one of the major problems plaguing people trying to forecast Earth's climate.

Martin Stute of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, N.Y., and his colleagues took the temperature of the tropics during the ice age by analyzing groundwater from aquifers in northeastern Brazil at a latitude of 7oS. The researchers measured the concentrations of four noble gases--neon, argon, krypton, and xenon--in water samples pulled from enclosed aquifers hundreds of meters below the surface.

Because gas is more soluble in cooler water, the scientists could gauge the temperature of the water at the time it percolated down into the aquifers.

Using the carbon-14 dating technique, Stute and his colleagues determined an age for each water sample. Samples less than 10,000 years old had an average temperature of 29.6oC, while older samples, from the glacial epoch, averaged 24.2oC, the scientists report in the July 21 Science.

Evidence of a marked drop in temperature so close to the equator conflicts with data collected by oceanographers in the 1970s, which indicate that the low-latitude oceans cooled by less than 2oC.

Another recent study from South America also challenges the idea of unvarying tropical warmth during the ice age. In the July 7 Science, Lonnie G. Thompson of Ohio State University in Columbus and his coworkers describe new climate data collected during an expedition to the Peruvian Andes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ice Age Sent Shivers through the Tropics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.