Magazine, TV Portrayals of Miley's Dad Miss Point

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 11, 2007 | Go to article overview

Magazine, TV Portrayals of Miley's Dad Miss Point


Byline: Marybeth Hicks, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Perhaps I'm dating myself here, but does it strike anyone else as perverse that Bruce Springsteen - the Boss - was recently outpaced in concert ticket sales by child star Miley Cyrus? In fact, scalpers are fetching upward of $1,000 for tickets to see Miley onstage.

This should come as no surprise to me. I live with a 10-year-old daughter who has followed the "Hannah Montana" star's meteoric rise to fame since Disney propelled young Miley into the stratosphere of tween celebrity.

"Hannah Montana" is on TV so much around here, I've decided there are more episodes of this hit sitcom than there were of the classic show "M*A*S*H." If you recall, there were approximately 7 billion of those.

Those of you residing in caves may not have heard that "Hannah Montana" features Miley Cyrus and her father, erstwhile country singer Billy Ray Cyrus, in the role of Miley's TV father.

Miley plays a "normal" middle schooler who also happens to be Hannah Montana, a worldwide singing sensation (in disguise). Billy Ray's role is one perfected on Disney and other children's channels - the goofy, lovable but somewhat inept parent who occasionally provides wise counsel between bumbling, comic foibles.

Mr. Cyrus is not new to fame as an entertainer. Even if you live in a cave, you'll recall that he was the one-hit wonder who gave us "Achy Breaky Heart" - and the mullet.

Now with a slightly more studied haircut (something akin to "intentionally messy") Mr. Cyrus is a cool middle-aged guy whose rapport with his daughter during her Disney audition apparently was so convincing, the producers asked him to play the role of his daughter's father on TV.

Here's the rub: After reading a feature article about Mr. Cyrus, I'm wishing he was more interested in playing the role of Miley's father in real life. Instead, he apparently sees himself as Miley's "best friend."

Isn't that special? Dad and daughter. BFFs. (Best friends forever).

Sharing secrets. Shopping for new jeans together. Sending text messages between takes on their hit show. …

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