They Couldn't Break Me: As a Civil Servant Awaits Trial under the Official Secrets Act, a Former Whistleblower, Katharine Gun, Urges the Brown Government to Stop the Hounding

By Gun, Katharine | New Statesman (1996), October 22, 2007 | Go to article overview

They Couldn't Break Me: As a Civil Servant Awaits Trial under the Official Secrets Act, a Former Whistleblower, Katharine Gun, Urges the Brown Government to Stop the Hounding


Gun, Katharine, New Statesman (1996)


Derek Pasquill has waited 18 long months before the charges under the Official Secrets Act were brought against him. On 11 October, exactly five years since the US Congress overwhelmingly authorised an invasion of Iraq, Mr Pasquill, a former official at the Foreign Office, made his first court appearance.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

I understand the anxiety and stress that anyone would feel, faced not only with the long wait before being charged under the OSA, but also the loss of employment and the glare of publicity. Four years ago, in November 2003, I made my own first appearance. I had waited eight months before Lord Goldsmith, then attorney general, decided to charge me with breach of the OSA.

In March 2003, I had leaked a top-secret email, alerting the public to illegal spying and potential blackmail at the United Nations, which was printed in the Observer. I did so in the belief that Britain would not invade Iraq without a UN resolution and that the actions sought of GCHQ, the British government's listening station, by the US National Security Agency were illegal. Just three months after charging me, the prosecution dropped the charges in a dramatic U-turn, announcing that "there was no longer sufficient evidence for a realistic conviction". Faced with mounting evidence of government misrepresentation of the facts, the prosecution feared that a jury would find me innocent.

We have since learned much about that period. We know how Tony Blair had acquiesced to George W Bush's plan of regime change in Iraq as early as in April 2002. We know, thanks to the leaking of the "Downing Street memo" of July 2002, that Bush wanted to remove Saddam Hussein through military action, justified by the conjunction of terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. We know how the intelligence and facts were being fixed around the policy. We know that the linking of WMDs to terrorism was as tenuous as Bush's grasp of geography. We know that Lord Goldsmith's legal advice was not quite as it seemed. So, in this post-9/11 era, to whom do we turn for the facts?

In 2005, the NS published damning evidence. …

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