Susanne M. Winterling: Daniel Reich Gallery

By Bentley, Kyle | Artforum International, November 2007 | Go to article overview

Susanne M. Winterling: Daniel Reich Gallery


Bentley, Kyle, Artforum International


Lap dissolves have lost much of the appeal they had back when Citizen Kane (1941) introduced the Xanadu manse through an ominous series of overlapping images, each fading out as the subsequent one faded in, or when La Jetee (1962) utilized the transition for a more subjective sequence in which, according to the narrator, "images begin to ooze like confessions." By now, our eyes have become so conditioned by the more jarring interruptions of jump cuts and channel hops that multiple fade-outs and fade-ins seem rather hokey, relegated to "lesser" forms like screen savers and club visuals.

What, then, to make of Berlin-based artist Susanne M. Winterling's video montage Piles of Shade, 2006, on view in her recent exhibition "I'll be your mirror, but i'll dissolve ..." at Daniel Reich Gallery? Transitioning into one another via watery dissolves, the work's images, culled in part from books, magazines, and record covers, depict what the artist calls "female icons"--a stream that includes an androgynous fashion model, Left Bank figures of the 1920s and '30s, and Annemarie Schwarzenbach (a Swiss writer, photographer, and aristocrat-cum-radical). At one point, a multiple-exposure silhouette of Winterling, actress Tilda Swinton, and singer Brigitte Fontaine freezes in an acid-bright tableau that is a template for the synthetic sensibility expressed throughout the show. Identity, particularly female identity, here seems to be considered a collective blend rather than something unique to the individual.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Winterling portrays women in the process of becoming themselves, a process sometimes halted by societal forces (here represented, in a collage titled Por-cellanpferd, 2007, by a still from Werner Fassbinder's 1974 film Effi Briest that shows the disenfranchised title character in bed, gazing off to the side) and sometimes verging on becoming one another. In the video Le sens pratique, 2005, for example, two female figures wearing black stand against a black background continually swapping a beige Burberry trench coat; one woman reaches around the other's shoulders to dress her, an action that verges on an embrace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Susanne M. Winterling: Daniel Reich Gallery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.