Lutz & Guggisberg: Kunstverein Freiburg

By Scharrer, Eva | Artforum International, November 2007 | Go to article overview

Lutz & Guggisberg: Kunstverein Freiburg


Scharrer, Eva, Artforum International


The work of the Swiss duo Andres Lutz and Anders Guggisberg, much like that of their predecessors Fischli & Weiss, inspires critics to speak of a "cosmos" rather than an "oeuvre." Through a kind of encyclopedic indexing, the artists try to make their own sense of the chaos of the world. Lutz & Guggisberg's over-the-top scenarios make use of almost any medium imaginable in accumulations of innumerable objects that interweave the found with the crafted, the philosophic with the banal, the mystic with the playful and ironic. Their exhibition at Kunstverein Freiburg, a former public swimming pool, was installed in the main entrance hall and the second-floor gallery, with the two floors connected by a retro-futuristic Kontrollturm (Control Tower), 2007, made out of painted cardboard boxes and paper-towel rolls, which extends from the first floor to the upper-balcony gallery. An upper segment of the tower housed the two-channel video projection Einmal da horte ich ihn, da wusch er die Welt (Once When I Heard Him He Was Washing the World), 2007, about a mad scientist who reverses natural and man-made phenomena--for instance, making a mushroom cloud shrink back to nothing.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

One entered the second floor through Lutz & Guggisberg's Bibliothek (Library), a work in progress begun in 2000 that consists of a growing selection of fake books in a cozy setting filled with handmade furniture and objects. The titles include philosophy, art, and science books as well as novels, all nicely designed and eye-catching--only you can't open them. Their humorous titles and blurbs are printed on carefully crafted wooden objects, a fictional archive of great ideas that have never been put down on paper. …

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