Mario Garcia Torres: Stedelijk Museum CS

By Lutticken, Sven | Artforum International, November 2007 | Go to article overview

Mario Garcia Torres: Stedelijk Museum CS


Lutticken, Sven, Artforum International


The work of Mario Garcia Torres traces and restages half-hidden histories and lost moments. For example, the slide piece What Happens in Halifax Stays in Halifax (In 36 Slides), 2004-2006, explores the aftermath of a "secret piece" by Robert Barry, executed by students in Halifax in 1969; neither the black-and-white images nor the subtitles give direct clues as to the nature of this piece, which only exists, if at all, in the participants' memories. Even while taking part in the current wave of reinvestigation, and sometimes fetishization, of historical Conceptualism, Garcia Torres is noteworthy for exploring historical and political connections that exceed the limits of standard art history; a number of works from 2006 are based on the One Hotel run by Alighiero Boetti in Kabul--a war-torn city where any trace of this venture has probably been erased.

The centerpiece of Garcia Torres's exhibition (curated by Martijn van Nieuwenhuyzen) at the Stedelijk Museum CS--the museum's temporary quarters while the old building is being restored and extended--was the video A Brief History of Jimmie Johnson's Legacy, 2006-2007. Toward the end, it shows color footage of three adolescents running through the Museo Nacional de Arte in Mexico City. Garcia Torres had asked these visitors to the museum to reenact a scene in Godard's Bande a part (1964) in which the three main characters break the speed record for visiting the Louvre (previously held by one "Jimmie Johnson"). Aside from this remake, the video consists of a montage of black-and-white stills from Bande a part and other films--an earlier variation on the Godard scene from Bernardo Bertolucci's The Dreamers (2003) as well as museum scenes from lighthearted fare such as L.A. Story (1991) and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986)--in combination with footage showing performative interventions in museums during the '60s and '70s by artists such as Vito Acconci and David Hammons.

Making no distinction between movie characters and artists, the voice-over wonders how such actions might function in the different context of today. However, with its smugly objective, disingenuously warm, and subtly patronizing tone, reminiscent of corporate videos, the voice itself seems to cast doubt on the seriousness of Garcia Torres's strategy of "rehearsing" obscure historical moments in order to see if they can still have an effect. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mario Garcia Torres: Stedelijk Museum CS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.