War Funds Depleted, Gates Says; Emergency Bill Now Necessary

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 16, 2007 | Go to article overview

War Funds Depleted, Gates Says; Emergency Bill Now Necessary


Byline: Sara A. Carter, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said yesterday that if Congress fails to approve war funds this week, combat troops and civilian personnel will face reductions in services and equipment.

The spending cuts would take effect next month if Congress doesn't pass an emergency war spending bill, Mr. Gates said.

"I strongly urged the Congress to pass a global war on terror funding bill that the president would sign," Mr. Gates said at a Pentagon briefing. "With the passage of the Defense Appropriations Act, there is a misperception that the department can continue funding our troops in the field for an indefinite period of time through accounting maneuvers. ... This is a serious misconception"

The cuts include terminating contracts, preparing bases for reduced operations and laying off civilian employees for the Army and Marine Corps, he said.

Mr. Gates, who met with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Deputy Treasury Secretary Robert M. Kimmitt along with members of Congress on Wednesday, said there are not enough adequate funds to support the war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"Congress has provided very limited flexibility to deal with this funding shortage," Mr. Gates said. "We can only move a total of $3.7 billion under general transfer authority, which only amounts to a little over one week's worth of war expenses."

The Pentagon began shuffling funds to cover war costs Tuesday, as soon as President Bush signed the Defense spending bill, which did not include war funds but permitted account transfers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

War Funds Depleted, Gates Says; Emergency Bill Now Necessary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.