Welcome to Cultural Analysis!

By Conrad , Joann | Cultural Analysis, Annual 2000 | Go to article overview

Welcome to Cultural Analysis!


Conrad , Joann, Cultural Analysis


Welcome to the first volume of Cultural Analysis: An Interdisciplinary Forum on Folklore and Popular Culture. Between and beyond disciplines, Cultural Analysis is global in scope and dialogic in form; it's distributed through the Internet, free of charge, with articles and reviews published on an on-going basis rather than periodically.

Cultural Analysis is a forum for the international scholarly community to exchange ideas and develop new lines of thinking about cultural forms, and to work with the ways in which these forms inform our daily lives while serving as resources for individual, group, and institutional expression. Cultural Analysis is dedicated to new ways of discussing, theorizing, and analyzing these cultural forms, their meanings, uses, and their relations to larger social structures. As we see it, the journal is post-disciplinary; challenging hardened boundaries and exploring neglected gaps and interstices between and within disciplines.

While Cultural Analysis is distributed on the Internet, the journal adheres to strict standards of scholarship and is fully peer-reviewed. The board of editors is a select international group of scholars representing a wide array of approaches and specializations. Uniting them, however, is a common concern with expressive and everyday culture, and the imperative to engage it analytically, by any means necessary--through theory, fieldwork, and/or text-criticism. We also share the conviction that dialogue across disciplines is essential to our intellectual enterprise.

Current conditions of knowledge call for new forms of scholarly communication, and Cultural Analysis is structured to induce discussion and fertilization across the disciplines. In addition to articles and reviews, each article is followed by two responses by scholars from outside the immediate field of the author, who nonetheless cover similar topics in their research. These responses suggest alternative analyses or expand on ideas put forth in the articles. Furthermore, after this inaugural volume, the posting of articles and reviews will be on-going, eliminating the time lag between periodic publications. In other words, one can access the scholarship and the critical response as they appear. However, we will close each volume at year's end so it can be printed and bound as a whole, in fixed-page format allowing for full citation. Thus Cultural Analysis offers the best of both worlds, the new and the conventional.

Response to Cultural Analysis has been extensive and enthusiastic, and we would like to thank in particular our colleagues from across the world who have joined our editorial board. Thanks also to the generous support of the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities and the Graduate Assembly at the University of California at Berkeley, whose contributions to Cultural Analysis have allowed us to bring an idea to material reality.

This first volume embodies the intent of the journal's charter. The contributors represent a wide international and disciplinary range, while the individual articles are quite interdisciplinary in content. …

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