Clay County CRIME SHEET; with Violent Acts Pushing Up the Crime Rates in Clay County, Sheriff Rick Beseler Hopes for Help in the Form of Federal Funding

By Maraghy, Mary | The Florida Times Union, November 17, 2007 | Go to article overview

Clay County CRIME SHEET; with Violent Acts Pushing Up the Crime Rates in Clay County, Sheriff Rick Beseler Hopes for Help in the Form of Federal Funding


Maraghy, Mary, The Florida Times Union


Byline: MARY MARAGHY

Violent crime is on the rise but some property crimes are going down in Clay County, according to recent statistics.

Murder and assaults have increased recently, pushing Clay County's overall crime rate up 7 percent, based on statistics from the first half of 2006 and 2007.

Violent crimes are the hardest to prevent, said Sheriff Rick Beseler, because most stem from alcohol and drug abuse, infidelity and other long-standing sociological problems that erupt from behind closed doors among not strangers, but people who know each other - spouses, parents, children, siblings, relatives, roommates and others.

Said Sharon Gogerty, spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement: "Violent crimes are the most difficult to predict and prevent. Many involve use of a firearm and are done in the heat of passion when people aren't thinking rationally about the consequences of their actions.

Gogerty cites statistics of an increase of murders by 28 percent in Florida and robbery by 13.4 percent from 2005 to 2006. She said crime statistics can be very tricky.

"It's hard to attribute crime to any single factor or any specific set of factors," she said.

Beseler said he expects violent crime will continue to rise in Clay as prevention programs get slashed as a result of a sagging economy and societal views.

"Most services are reactive. Our society has not funded social services to be proactive as well as reactive," said Sharon Youngerman, director of Quigley House, Clay County's domestic violence shelter.

Youngerman said her agency's government funding streams have remained flat though the population served and costs are rising. She said her agency eliminated an outreach counselor position and a violence prevention program, due to tight finances, and because it is hard to track the success of prevention efforts. "True prevention has not been funded in years."

Meanwhile, Beseler would like the funding to have a few more good deputies. Since Sept. 11, the military has sucked up funding and potential candidates for law enforcement, Beseler said. Optimum staffing levels for Clay County is 1.8 officers per 1,000 residents, he said. Currently, Clay County is 1.4 per 1,000. But Beseler said he is optimistic that federal government efforts are under way to replace funding for local departments and that the agency's existing deputies can keep the public safe in the meantime.

Beseler states that he's most proud of his office's ability to solve crime. The case clearance rate is almost double the state average.

"Clay County is a very, very safe community," he said, adding that residents should feel safe to walk and play in their neighborhoods.

Burglaries are down 11 percent, robberies dropped by 2.6 percent and auto thefts are down 1.5 percent in the first six months of 2007. Beseler said he expects a continued downward slope in these numbers thanks to the following initiatives:

- Night blitzes in high crime areas pinpointed by a new computerized crime analysis center. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clay County CRIME SHEET; with Violent Acts Pushing Up the Crime Rates in Clay County, Sheriff Rick Beseler Hopes for Help in the Form of Federal Funding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.