Physical Education Teacher Evaluation Tool

Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, November-December 2007 | Go to article overview

Physical Education Teacher Evaluation Tool


Introduction

The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), the preeminent national authority on physical education and a recognized leader in sport and physical activity, has origins that date back to 1885. A central aspect of this leadership is the development of national standards, guidelines, and position statements that set the standard for quality physical education programs. Quality physical education requires appropriate infrastructure (opportunity to learn), meaningful content defined by curriculum, appropriate instructional practices including good classroom management, student and program assessment, and evaluation.

All teachers benefit from meaningful, ongoing assessment and evaluation. The NASPE-developed Physical Education Teacher Evaluation Tool identifies the knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed to provide sound instruction in the K-12 physical education classroom. Its purpose is to assist principals, school district curriculum specialists, and others who evaluate physical education teachers as well as to guide physical education teachers in reflection and self-assessment, and serve as an instructional tool in college/university physical education teacher education programs.

Specific Uses for This Tool

K-12 Administrator

* Prioritize and rearrange the items on the evaluation tool to emphasize certain teaching knowledge/skills/behaviors.

* Modify the tool to meet needs for formative or summative observation and feedback.

* Customize the tool to target areas identified in a professional growth plan.

School District Curriculum Specialist

* Assist teachers with using the tool for professional growth.

* Provide in-service programs to help teachers address point of emphasis or areas of needed improvement.

* Incorporate the tool into the mentoring program for new teachers.

* Use the tool for formal or in formal observation of teachers.

K-12 Physical Education Teacher

* Use the tool for self-assessment (e.g., videotape a lesson and review).

* Study and prioritize the list of tool items to work on specific points of emphasis during instruction.

* Ask a colleague to observe a class and complete the evaluation tool for peer feedback.

College/University Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

* Use the tool to teach program candidates about critical instructional skills, for discussion and practice purposes. …

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Physical Education Teacher Evaluation Tool
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