Jay Rosen's Beat Reporting/Social Networking Project Signs Up 13 Reporters

By Strupp, Joe | Editor & Publisher, November 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Jay Rosen's Beat Reporting/Social Networking Project Signs Up 13 Reporters


Strupp, Joe, Editor & Publisher


At least 13 beat reporters have signed on to a new project by New York University professor and media blogger Jay Rosen that seeks to provide blogging space for beat writers and their sources.

Beatblogging.org, launched today via Rosen's newassignment.net site, reports that it has signed up reporters at news outlets ranging from the Houston Chronicle to MTV.

"My idea was to run parallel experiments to see whether 'beat reporting with a social network' is a viable pro-am method in journalism-- or just an attractive concept," Rosen writes on his Pressthink blog. "I said I was trying to recruit at least 12 beat reporters and get their editors on board with a simple proposition...Maybe a beat reporter could do a way better job if there was a 'live' social network connected to the beat, made up of people who know the territory the beat covers, and want the reporting on that beat to be better."

The result so far is a commitment from 13 reporters to use the approach as part of their regular beat networking and story organization.

Those Rosen says have signed up include; Eric Berger, a science reporter at the Houston Chronicle; Ed Silverman, a pharmaceutical reporter at The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J; Eliot Van Buskirk of Wired.com, a digital music columnist; Education reporters Kent Fischer and Tawnell Hobbs of the Dallas Morning News; Keith Reed of the Cincinnati Enquirer, who covers Proctor & Gamble; Henry Abbot of ESPN, who reports on pro basketball; Michelle Davis of Education Week on technology; Matt Nauman, an energy reporter for the San Jose Mercury News; Daniel Victor of The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa. …

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